Books

Canadian Amy Stuart's bestselling Still Mine thriller series to be adapted for television

Vancouver's Lark Productions has nabbed the exclusive rights to adapt the Toronto author's psychological thriller series. Actress Cobie Smulders will serve as executive producer and Stuart will act as co-executive producer.

Actress Cobie Smulders will serve as executive producer and Stuart will act as co-executive producer

Amy Stuart is a Toronto-based novelist. (Paige Lindsay)

Canadian novelist Amy Stuart's Still Mine series is set to be adapted for television. 

Vancouver-based Lark Productions has acquired the exclusive television rights to Stuart's bestselling thriller novel Still Mine, the sequel Still Water and the recently released third novel in the series, Still Here.

Canadian writer Lara Azzopardi will adapt the project for television and serve as showrunner and executive producer.

Canadian actress Cobie Smulders will serve as executive producer and Stuart will act as co-executive producer.

Stuart's 2016 novel Still Mine introduced readers to Clare O'Dey, an unexpected investigator searching for the truth about the suspicious disappearance of a local woman in a small mining town, where everyone is implicated.

In the sequel Still WaterClare seeks out a missing mother and son, only to be caught up in a web of deception; in Still HereClare is on the hunt for two missing persons and unearths secrets that an entire community is trying to leave in the past.

Stuart is a Toronto-based novelist, teacher and short story writer.

"I'm excited to work with Lark Productions and bring Clare's story to a wider audience on television," said Stuart in a statement.

Add some “good” to your morning and evening.

A variety of newsletters you'll love, delivered straight to you.

Sign up now

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

Become a CBC Member

Join the conversation  Create account

Already have an account?

now