Books·Canadian

Broken Strings

A middle-grade novel by Eric Walters and Kathy Kacer.

Eric Walters & Kathy Kacer

It's 2002. In the aftermath of the twin towers — and the death of her beloved grandmother — Shirli Berman is intent on moving forward. The best singer in her junior high, she auditions for the lead role in Fiddler on the Roof, but is crushed to learn that she's been given the part of the old Jewish mother in the musical rather than the coveted part of the sister. But there is an upside: her "husband" is none other than Ben Morgan, the cutest and most popular boy in the school. Deciding to throw herself into the role, she rummages in her grandfather's attic for some props.

There, she discovers an old violin in the corner — strange, since her Zayde has never seemed to like music, never even going to any of her recitals. Showing it to her grandfather unleashes an anger in him she has never seen before, and while she is frightened of what it might mean, Shirli keeps trying to connect with her Zayde and discover the awful reason behind his anger. A long-kept family secret spills out and Shirli learns the true power of music, both terrible and wonderful. (From Puffin Canada)

Broken Strings is for readers aged 10-14.

Broken Strings will be available in Sept. 2019.

Eric Walters is a Canadian author of YA novels and picture books. Walters is a recipient of the Order of Canada and considered one of the country's most prolific and successful writers for young people. 

Kathy Kacer is a prolific Toronto-based author whose parents were both survivors of the Holocaust. Her books, including Hiding Edith and Masters of Silence explore the lives of young Jewish people who lived during that time.

Interviews with Kathy Kacer

Helping Children To Understand The Horrors of the Holocaust... Kathy Kacer is an award winning children's author who has come to Cape Breton for Nova Scotia Holocaust Education Week. (runs 6:56 November 13, 2014) 6:56

More books by Eric Walters

More books by Kathy Kacer

 

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