Books·Canadian

A Likkle Miss Lou

A picture book by Nadia L. Hohn and Eugenie Fernandes.

Nadia L. Hohn, illustrated by Eugenie Fernandes

Jamaican poet and entertainer Louise Bennett Coverley, better known as "Miss Lou," played an instrumental role in popularizing Jamaican patois internationally. Through her art, Miss Lou helped pave the way for other poets and singers, like Bob Marley, to use patois in their work. 

This picture book biography tells the story of Miss Lou's early years, when she was a young girl who loved poetry but felt caught between writing "lines of words like tight cornrows" or words that beat "in time with her heart." Despite criticism from one teacher, Louise finds a way to weave the influence of the music, voices and rhythms of her surroundings into her poems. 

A vibrant, colourful and immersive look at an important figure in Jamaica's cultural history, this is also a universal story of a child finding and trusting her own voice. End matter includes a glossary of Jamaican patois terms, a note about the author's "own voice" perspective and a brief biography of Miss Lou and her connection to Canada, where she spent 20 years of her life. (From Owlkids Books)

Nadia L. Hohn is a children's book author from Toronto. Her other titles include Malaika's Costume and Malaika's Winter Carnival

Eugenie Fernandes is an artist and children's book illustrator based in Ontario.

Interviews with Nadia L. Hohn

This poem appears in Nadia L. Hohn's book, A Likkle Miss Lou. 0:15
Louise “Miss Lou” Bennett recorded music, hosted radio and television programs, published books and taught folklore. She spent the last 20 years of her life in Canada, where she helped inspire generations of Caribbean-Canadians. Michael’s guest is Nadia L. Hohn (PRON. Hahn) -- a teacher, writer and author of a new children’s book, A Likkle Miss Lou, to mark the 100th anniversary of Miss Lou’s birth. 26:46

Other books by Nadia L. Hohn

Other books illustrated by Eugenie Fernandes

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