Books·Canadian

A Family for Faru

A picture book by Anitha Rao-Robinson, illustrated by Karen Patkau.

Anitha Rao-Robinson, illustrated by Karen Patkau

In this touching story of belonging and environmental awareness, a young boy's courage and ingenuity help an orphaned rhinoceros find safety in a new herd.

Tetenya and his mother have found Faru, a baby rhinoceros, alone on the savannah. They know that rhino sanctuaries will adopt orphaned infants, but finding the rangers who protect local herds may be a long and risky prospect—there are poachers lurking about the landscape. Undaunted, Tetenya sets out, leading Faru past giraffes CHOMP-CHOMPING on acacia leaves, amongst vervet monkeys SLURP-SLURPING sweet fruits, and around guinea fowl SCRITCH-SCRITCHING the earth for seeds. Suddenly, danger is upon them: two poachers are coming near. There are only seconds to spare, and Tetenya has nothing but his wits and a handful of berries to help him.

In A Family for Faru, author Anitha Rao-Robinson draws inspiration from her life-changing time spent on the savannah and from conservationists' innovation to discourage poachers: injecting a pink dye into rhinoceros horns. Award-winning illustrator Karen Patkau's dreamy landscapes reflect her own travels in the region and celebrate the courage and ingenuity of a young boy as he helps his four-legged friend find a place to belong. (From Pajama Press)

Anitha Rao-Robinson is a former accountant who now writes children's books. Her other books include Broken Promises and Broken Worlds.

Karen Patkau is a Canadian author, artist, designer and illustrator. She has written and illustrated several nature-themed books for children, including Ringtail, Creatures Great and Small and Who Needs and Iceberg?

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