Books·Canadian

77 Fragments of a Familiar Ruin

77 Fragments of a Familiar Ruin is a poetry collection by Thomas King.

Thomas King

Seventy-seven poems intended as a eulogy for what we have squandered, a reprimand for all we have allowed, a suggestion for what might still be salvaged, a poetic quarrel with our intolerant and greedy selves, a reflection on mortality and longing, as well as a long-running conversation with the mythological currents that flow throughout North America. (From HarperCollins)

Thomas King is a Canadian-American writer of Cherokee and Greek ancestry. He delivered the 2003 Massey Lectures, The Truth about Stories. His books include Truth & Bright WaterThe Inconvenient Indian and The Back of the Turtle. He also writes the DreadfulWater mystery series.

From the book

An excerpt from 77 Fragments of a Familiar Ruin by Thomas King. (Helen Hoy, HarperCollins)
An excerpt from 77 Fragments of a Familiar Ruin by Thomas King. (Helen Hoy, HarperCollins)
An excerpt from 77 Fragments of a Familiar Ruin by Thomas King. (Helen Hoy, HarperCollins)
An excerpt from 77 Fragments of a Familiar Ruin by Thomas King. (Helen Hoy, HarperCollins)

Interviews with Thomas King

Thomas King, the award-winning writer of fiction and non-fiction, turns his hand to poetry in his latest book, 77 Fragments of a Familiar Ruin, 15:55
Recorded at Montreal's Blue Metropolis International Literary Festival, Thomas King joins Rosanna Deerchild on stage in this extended conversation about writing, research and Indigenous humour. 40:13
Shelagh's conversation with Thomas King about his novel "The Back of the Turtle". It's the winner of the 2014 Governor General's Award for Fiction. 39:27

Other books by Thomas King

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