Books·Fall Preview

48 Canadian poetry collections to watch for in fall 2022

Fans of poetry have plenty of great reads to choose from in the second half of the year.

From typewriter poems to verse accompanied by visuals, to new works by viral Instagram poets, there's something for every reader in the vast slate of poetry books coming out in fall 2022.

Smog Mother by John Wall Barger

Black-and-white portrait of poet John Wall Barger looking directly at the camera; on the right is the cover of his book Smog Mother, which features the title in white type on a black background.
Smog Mother is the sixth poetry collection from American-Canadian poet and academic John Wall Barger. (Tiina Rosenqvist, Palimpsest Press)

In his sixth collection of poetry, Smog Mother, John Wall Barger examines notions of home in wide-ranging poems that traverse the world, from a protest rally on the streets of Bangkok to a train trip on the Trans-Mongolian Railway.

When you can read it: Sept. 1, 2022

John Wall Barger is the author of five previous books of poetry: Pain-proof Men, Hummingbird, The Book of Festus, The Mean Game and Resurrection Fail. He is a contract editor at Frontenac House and teaches in the creative writing program at the University of the Arts in Philadelphia.

Witness Back at Me by Weyman Chan

Portrait of poet Weyman Chan looking off to the left, wearing a white checked shirt and metal-rimmed glasses. On the right is the cover of his book Witness Back at Me, featuring a woman standing on the shoreline.
Witness Back at Me is the sixth poetry collection from Calgary poet Weyman Chan. (Talonbooks)

In Witness Back at Me, Calgary poet Weyman Chan explores themes of dislocation and belonging, looking back at the childhood loss of his mother to breast cancer and through poems that intertwine in a larger narrative and work toward understanding and healing.

When you can read it: Sept. 1, 2022

Weyman Chan is the author of five previous books of poetry. His work has been shortlisted for the Acorn-Plantos Award for Peoples Poetry, the W.O. Mitchell Book Prize, and the Governor General's Literary Awards. He was the 2021 recipient of the Latner Writers' Trust Poetry Prize.

The Oysters I Bring to Banquets by Gary Geddes

On the left is a portrait of author Gary Geddes with white hair and beard, wearing glasses and a brown leather jacket. On the right is the cover of his book The Oysters I Bring to Banquets, featuring a painting of medieval people carrying bowls in a forest.
The Oysters I Bring to Banquets is a poetry collection by B.C. writer Gary Geddes. (Ann Eriksson, Guernica Editions)

Veteran poet Gary Geddes's latest collection, The Oysters I Bring to Banquets, is a series of hymns to art, beauty and human dignity, with poems touching on everything from the building of a greenhouse to the struggle of characters in classical legends, to Yukon adventures and the plight of Monarch butterflies in the Mexican highlands. 

When you can read it: Sept. 1, 2022

B.C.-based author Gary Geddes has written and edited more than 50 books, and won several literary awards, including the Commonwealth Poetry Prize (Americas Region), the Lt.-Governor's Award for Literary Excellence and the Gabriela Mistral Prize.

Dream of Me as Water by David Ly

Portrait of poet David Ly wearing black against a colourful backdrop; on the right is the cover of his book Dream of Me as Water, which features a blue fish tail.
Dream of Me as Water is Burnaby, B.C.-based poet David Ly's second collection of poetry. (Erin Flegg, Palimpsest Press)

In his second book of poetry, Dream of Me as Water, David Ly expands on the themes in his debut Mythical Man. He uses water as a central metaphor to explore how identity is never a stagnant concept, but rather fluid and ever-evolving.

When you can read it: Sept. 1, 2022

David Ly is a B.C.-based writer and editor whose 2020 debut poetry collection, Mythical Man, was shortlisted for the 2021 Relit Poetry Award. He is also co-editor with Daniel Zomparelli for Queer Little Nightmares: an Anthology of Monstrous Fiction and Poetry. CBC Books named him a writer to watch in 2020.

Another Way To Split Water by Alycia Pirmohamed

At left, a photo of writer Alycia Pirmohamed standing in a field of leafy green plants. She has long black hair and is wearing an orange shirt and black jacket. On the right is the cover of her poetry book Another Way to Split Water, which features a wavy blue graphic on the left side and a plain white background on the right side.
Another Way to Split Water is 2019 CBC Poetry Prize winner Alycia Pirmohamed's debut poetry collection. (Birlinn Ltd.)

2019 CBC Poetry Prize winner Alycia Pirmohamed's debut collection, Another Way To Split Water, is a lyrical exploration of how ancestral memory transforms across generations, through stories told and retold. Her poems touch on womanhood, belonging, faith, intimacy and the natural world.

When you can read it: Sept. 1, 2022

Alycia Pirmohamed is a Canadian-born poet based in Scotland. She is the co-founder of the Scottish BPOC Writers Network, a co-organizer of the Ledbury Poetry Critics Program, and currently teaches creative writing at the University of Cambridge.

WJD by Khashayar Mohammadi

WJD is a poetry collection by Khashayar Mohammadi. (Gordon Hill Press)

WJD is a poetry collection that explores the power of an individual's lived experience of the world, particularly those with Western Asian roots. The poetry irreverently compares and contrasts the various ideologies and spiritual perspectives of Islamicate cultures. The book also includes The OceanDweller, a translation of Saeed Tavanaee Marvi's experimental tale with themes of astronomy, marine biology and the power of poetry.

When you can read it: Sept. 1, 2022

Mohammadi is a poet and translator from Iran who now lives in Toronto. They were shortlisted for the 2021 Austin Clarke Prize in poetry and are the winner of the Vallum Poetry Prize 2021. Their debut poetry collection, Me, You, Then Snow, was published in 2021.

Exculpatory Lilies by Susan Musgrave

Exculpatory Lilies is a poetry collection by Susan Musgraves. (McClelland & Stewart, Kathleen Hinkel)

Renowned Canadian poet Susan Musgrave lost her husband in 2018 and her daughter in 2021. Her newest poetry collection, Exculpatory Lilies, explores this expansive grief but also the natural world and the connection between the two, searching for the beauty in the emotional highs and lows of life.

When you can read it: Sept. 1, 2022

Susan Musgrave is a poet and writer based in B.C. She has has received awards for poetry, fiction, nonfiction, personal essay, children's writing and for her work as an editor. She has published many books, including Love You MoreMore Blueberries and Kiss, Tickle, Cuddle, Hug

Surface Tension by Derek Beaulieu

On the left, a photo of poet Derek Beaulieu sitting on stairs, wearing a plaid shirt and glasses. On the right, the cover of his poetry book Surface Tension, with turquoise graphics and text over an salmon-coloured background.
Surface Tension is a poetry collection by Banff-based poet Derek Beaulieu. (Kristen Beaulieu, Coach House Books)

Surface Tension is visual poetry for the post-pandemic age, asking the reader to imagine letters as images instead of text and find meaning in their shapes as Derek Beaulieu molds them into Dali-style collages.

When you can read it: Sept. 6, 2022

Derek Beaulieu is the author or editor of more than 25 books of poetry, prose and criticism. He has exhibited his visual work across Canada, the United States and Europe. He is currently the director of literary arts at the Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity and Banff's poet laureate.

Icarus, Falling of Birds by Harry Thurston, with photographs by Thaddeus Holownia

Composite image of a portrait of poet Harry Thurston, left -- a man with brown curly hair in front of the ocean; the book cover of Icarus, Falling of Birds in the middle -- a white background with illustrations of yellow birds -- and at right is a photo of photographer Thaddeus Holownia, a man with long white hair and round wire-rim glasses looking directly into the camera.
Icarus, Falling of Birds is a collaboration between poet Harry Thurston, left, and photographer Thaddeus Holownia. (Acadia University, Anchorage Press, Pierre Fournier/CBC)

Icarus, Falling of Birds, a collaboration between poet Harry Thurston and photographer Thaddeus Holownia, memorializes the deaths of migratory songbirds who were drawn to a 100-foot-high flare at the Canaport Liquefied Natural Gas plant in Saint John. The pair were able to gain access to evidence held at the New Brunswick Museum, and have produced an elegy to the thousands of birds that perished.

When you can read it: Sept. 6, 2022

Harry Thurston is a poet, journalist, and author of more than two dozen books of poetry and non-fiction.

Thaddeus Holownia is emeritus professor of fine arts at Mount Allison University. His photographs have been exhibited and collected at museums throughout North America and Europe.

Vox Humana by Adebe DeRango-Adem

On the left, a portrait of poet Adebe DeRango-Adem -- she has long black curly hair and is looking directly into the camera over one shoulder, wearing a bright blue floral top. On the right is the cover of her poetry book Vox Humana, featuring the title in yellow and white over a gold and blue graphic background.
Vox Humana is the fourth poetry collection by Toronto-based poet Adebe DeRango-Adem. (Selena Phillips-Boyle, Book*hug Press)

Vox Humana is Latin for "human voice" — particularly apt given poet Adebe DeRango-Adem's exploration of word and sound in a world that uplifts some voices over others. Drawing on her own multilingual upbringing, DeRango-Adem offers up poems that remind us of the work required to raise our voices to transform society.

When you can read it: Sept. 8, 2022

Adebe DeRango-Adem is the author of three previous full-length poetry books to date: Ex Nihilo, Terra Incognita and The Unmooring. She lives in Toronto.

Test Piece by Sheryda Warrener

On the left, a portrait of poet Sheryda Warrener. She has short brown hair and is wearing a navy blue shirtdress and is seated on a bench in front of a flowering bush. On the right, the cover of her poetry book Test Piece, featuring her name and the title in light-yellow block letters over a blue background and white rectangular graphics.
Test Piece is Vancouver poet Sheryda Warrener's third collection of poetry. (Jackie Dives, Coach House Books)

Influenced by visual art, the poems in Test Piece bring images and lines together through patterns and rhythm. A collection that began with Sheryda Warrener's impulse to see herself more clearly, Test Piece offers up a broader meditation on seeing and vision.

When you can read it: Sept. 13, 2022

Sheryda Warrener is the author of the poetry collections Hard Feelings and Floating is Everything. She is a recipient of The Puritan's Thomas Morton Memorial Prize for poetry and was longlisted for the 2020 CBC Poetry Prize. Warrener lives in Vancouver and teaches poetry and interdisciplinary forms in the School of Creative Writing at the University of British Columbia.

Durable Goods by James Pollock

On the left, a photo of poet James Pollock -- he is wearing a black sweater and smiling at the camera while in front of a bookshelf. On the right, the cover of his poetry book Durable Goods, which depicts a metal measuring spoon with golden-yellow powder spilling out of it.
Durable Goods is a poetry collection by Canadian-born, U.S.-based poet and professor James Pollock. (JamesPollock.com, Véhicule Press)

Durable Goods is a collection of poems about everyday technology. James Pollock brings everything from microwaves to kettles to life — revealing that these objects that surround us are in many ways reflections of ourselves. In reimagining the tools we use, Pollock suggests that the most durable good is language itself.

When you can read it: Sept. 14, 2022

James Pollock is the author of Sailing to Babylon, which was a finalist for the Griffin Poetry Prize and the Governor General's Literary Award for poetry. His other books include You Are Here: Essays on the Art of Poetry in Canada and The Essential Daryl Hine. He grew up in southern Ontario, and is now a professor of English at Loras College in Iowa. He lives in Madison, Wisc.

Some People Fall in the Lodge and Then Eat Berries All Winter by annie ross

On the left, a photo of author Annie Ross facing the camera and smiling; she is wearing a colourful woven headband around her brown hair. On the right is the cover of her poetry book Some People Fall in the Lodge and Then Eat Berries All Day, which features a floral illustration and two green-stockinged legs sitting on a stool.
Some People Fall in the Lodge and Then Eat Berries All Winter is a collection of poetry and woodcut images by writer and artist annie ross. (sfu.ca, Talonbooks)

In her timely follow-up to Pots and Other Living Beings, Maya/Irish writer and artist annie ross explores themes of environmental justice, extinction and animal rights through poetry, prose and her own woodcut artwork in Some People Fall in the Lodge and Then Eat Berries All Winter.

When you can read it: Sept. 15, 2022

annie ross is a working artist and a professor in the department of Indigenous studies at Simon Fraser University.

Bent Back Tongue by Garry Gottfriedson

On the left is a photo of poet Garry Gottfriedson. He is wearing a black shirt and is in front of a grey background, looking intently into the camera. On the right is a photo of the cover of his poetry book Bent Back Tongue, which features white text and a drawing of a yellow fox against a red background.
Bent Back Tongue is a poetry collection by Secwépemc rancher and poet Garry Gottfriedson. (Farah Nosh, Caitlin Press)

In Bent Back Tongue, Secwépemc rancher and renowned poet Garry Gottfriedson explores contemporary masculinity, politics and love — all with an unflinching eye on colonial history but also celebrating love, land, family and the self.

When you can read it: Sept. 16, 2022

Garry Gottfriedson is from Kamloops, B.C. He is strongly rooted in his Secwépemc (Shuswap) cultural teachings. In the late 1980s, Gottfriedson studied under Allen Ginsberg, Marianne Faithfull and others at the Naropa Institute in Boulder, Colo. He is the author of 10 books, including Clinging to Bone and Skin Like Mine. Currently, he works at Thompson Rivers University.

Exit Wounds by Tariq Malik

On the left, a photo of author Tariq Malik. He has white hair and glasses and is smiling directly at the camera in front of a backdrop of trees. On the right is the cover of his poetry book Exit Wounds, which features the picture of a girl wearing a headscarf, sitting in a tree.
Exit Wounds is a poetry collection by Vancouver-based writer Tariq Malik. (Caitlin Press)

In Exit Wounds, Indo-Canadian poet Tariq Malik draws on his own family's experiences of immigration to uncover what it truly means to belong. Combining traditional Punjabi mythology with contemporary events that have shaped the lives of immigrants, his poems resonate with those who have experienced feeling out of place — yet recognize the truth of their own experiences.

When you can read it: Sept. 16, 2022

Born in Pakistani Punjab, Vancouver-based author Tariq Malik survived three wars, two migrations and two decades of slaving in the Kuwaiti desert before arriving in Canada. For the past four decades, he has worked across poetry, fiction and the visual arts, working in response to the changing world around him and his own place in it.

Fire Cider Rain by Rhiannon Ng Cheng Hin

At left, a photo of writer Rhiannon Ng Cheng Hin, dressed in a green dress with brown belt, posing in front of trees with tall buildings in the background. On the right is the cover of her book Fire Cider Rain, featuring multicoloured clouds.
Fire Cider Rain is the debut poetry collection by Quebec-based writer Rhiannon Ng Cheng Hin. (Jasmine Acharya, Coach House Books)

In her debut poetry collection, Fire Cider Rain, Rhiannon Ng Cheng Hin examines cultural identity through the lives of three Chinese-Mauritian women and the familial bonds that tie them to each other and their home country. Setting her work in the Mauritian landscape and waterways of southern Ontario, Ng Cheng Hin uses water as a central metaphor for the movement of bodies, stories and cultures.

When you can read it: Sept. 20, 2022

Rhiannon Ng Cheng Hin was born in Edinburgh and lives in the Gatineau Valley in Quebec. Her poetry has been published in Gutter, The Malahat Review, Grain, Arc Poetry Magazine and elsewhere. She currently serves as associate poetry editor with Plenitude magazine.

The Most Charming Creatures by Gary Barwin

On the left, a portrait of writer Gary Barwin. He has white hair and grey glasses and is posting against a black background wearing a black shirt, holding his hand up to the side of his face. On the right is the cover of his poetry book The Most Charming Creatures, featuring a blue illustration of a machine with wings set against a black background.
The Most Charming Creatures is a poetry collection by Hamilton, Ont. author, artist and composer Gary Barwin. (George Qua-Enoo, ECW Press)

A follow-up to Gary Barwin's collection of selected poetry, The Most Charming Creatures continues his examination of the possibilities of what a poem can be. Barwin harkens back to 1860s scientific illustrator Ernst Haeckel's concept of the "most charming creatures," turning his lens on how language, culture and the self can be perhaps just as mysterious.

When you can read it: Sept. 20, 2022

The bestselling author of 26 books of fiction and poetry, Gary Barwin has won the Stephen Leacock Memorial Medal for Humour, the Canadian Jewish Literary Award, and has been a finalist for the Governor General's Literary Award and the Scotiabank Giller Prize. He lives in Hamilton, Ont.

A Is for Acholi by Otoniya J. Okot Bitek

On the left, a photo of writer Otoniya J. Okot Bitek wearing a red silk tank top and sitting in front of a bookshelf. On the right, the cover of her poetry book A is for Acholi, featuring a red-and-black painted close-up of a woman's face.
A is for Acholi is a poetry collection by writer and professor Otoniya J. Okot Bitek. (Seasmin Taylor, Buckrider Books)

A Is for Acholi is a lyrical collection that plays with language to explore diaspora and the marginalization of the Acholi people of northeast Africa. Otoniya J. Okot Bitek traces a route from history's past to a more hopeful present.

When you can read it: Sept. 20, 2022

Otoniya J. Okot Bitek is a poet and scholar. Her collection of poetry 100 Days  was nominated for the 2017 BC Book Prize, the Pat Lowther Award and the 2017 Alberta Book Awards. It won the 2017 IndieFab Book of the Year Award for poetry and the 2017 Glenna Lushei Prize for African Poetry. She was also longlisted for the 2018 CBC Poetry Prize. She is an assistant professor of Black Creativity at Queen's University.

This Is a Stickup by Amber McMillan

On the left is a photo of author Amber McMillan - she is wearing a black top and smiling into the camera while sitting in front of a red painting. On the right is the cover of her poetry book This is a Stickup, which features her name and the title in yellow type over a beige background in which bullet holes are depicted.
This is a Stickup is New Brunswick writer Amber McMillan's second book of poetry. (Nathaniel G. Moore, Wolsak and Wynn)

In This Is a Stickup, Amber McMillan delves into grief — and allows the reader to grieve alongside her, touching on everything from violence to love. Through indelible images — a man peering in a window; a swing set on fire — McMillan offers poems both intimate yet powerful.

When you can read it: Sept. 20, 2022

Amber McMillan is the author of the short story collection The Running Trees, the memoir The Woods: A Year on Protection Island and the poetry collection We Can't Ever Do This Again. She lives in New Brunswick.

If I Didn't Love the River by Robert Priest

On the left, a portrait of writer Robert Priest. He is looking directly into the camera and wearing a black shirt. On the right, the cover of his poetry book If I Didn't Love the River, featuring a sepia-toned vintage photograph of two young children holding a woman's hands while standing by the riverbank.
If I Didn't Love the River is a poetry collection by Toronto poet and songwriter Robert Priest. (Allen Booth, ECW Press)

Through sonnets, free verse, prose poems, villanelles, ghazals and aphorisms, If I Didn't Love the River speaks directly to the polarizations of our time. Robert Priest covers the gamut of emotion — from angst, anger, anguish and despair to sheer delight — in ruminating on the things that make us human: love, death, sex and illness.

When you can read it: Sept. 20, 2022

Robert Priest's words have been debated in the legislature, posted on buses, quoted in the Farmers' Almanac, and turned into a hit song. He lives in Toronto.

The History Forest by Michael Trussler

On the left is a black-and-white photo of author Michael Trussler. He has short white hair and is wearing glasses and looking directly at the camera, while sitting in front of a wall featuring several paintings. On the right is the cover of his book The History Forest, which features an image of a green owl in the centre of a beige background.
The History Forest is a poetry collection by writer and University of Regina professor Michael Trussler. (Palimpsest Press, University of Regina Press)

In The History Forest, Michael Trussler explores the contradictory nature of what it means to be alive in this strange era, grappling with everything from nuclear war, school shootings and ecological destruction alongside his own experiences with mental health, aging and loss.

When you can read it: Sept. 24, 2022

Michael Trussler is an award-winning author whose previous works include the short fiction collection Encounters and the poetry collection Accidental Animals. He is a professor of English at the University of Regina.

The Program by Megan Fennya Jones

On the left, a photo of writer Megan Fennya Jones. She has long blonde hair and is wearing a blue blouse and looking directly into the camera. On the right is the cover of her poetry book The Program, featuring a blurry pastel-blue image.
The Program is the debut poetry collection by Vancouver writer Megan Fennya Jones. (twitter.com/fennya__, Goose Lane Editions)

The Program follows a young woman travelling between Paris and New York to pursue a modelling career. Jones draws on a keenly observant narrative style in poems delving into mental health, romance and female suffering to examine how we are seen — and how we see ourselves.

When you can read it: Sept. 24, 2022

Megan Fennya Jones's poetry has appeared in Poetry Northwest, Room Magazine and PRISM International, in the anthology The City Series Number One: Vancouver, and the chapbook Normal Women. She lives in Vancouver.

Healing Through Words by Rupi Kaur

At left, a photo of poet Rupi Kaur, wearing a pink embroidered shirt and looking directly into the camera in front of a blue background. At right, the cover for her book Healing Through Words, featuring a blue-and-white line drawing of a seated woman over a pink background.
Healing Through Words is a collection of guided poetry exercises by bestselling poet Rupi Kaur. (Nabil Shash, Simon & Schuster)

Bestselling poet Rupi Kaur returns with a book of guided poetry writing exercises that encourages others to explore trauma, loss, heartache, love and healing through writing that taps into the same vulnerability that has made her poems resonate with so many readers.

When you can read it: Sept. 27, 2022

Ontario poet, artist and performer Rupi Kaur first garnered attention on Instagram, where she continues to share her poems and simple line drawings with millions of followers. At 21, Kaur wrote, illustrated and self-published her first poetry collection, milk and honey. Next came its artistic sibling, the sun and her flowers. These collections have sold over 10 million copies and have been translated into over 40 languages.

The End Is in the Middle by Daniel Scott Tysdal

On the left, a black-and-white photo of author Daniel Scott Tysdale. He has curly hair and a beard and is staring directly into the camera while standing in front of a textured rock-like surface. On the right side is the cover of his poetry book The End is the Middle, which features the title in black text over an image of a brain on fire.
The End Is in the Middle is a poetry collection by Toronto-based writer and teacher Daniel Scott Tysdal. (danielscotttysdal.com, Goose Lane Editions)

Daniel Scott Tysdal's latest poetry collection, The End Is in the Middle, examines madness as lived experience and artistic method. Inspired by Al Jaffee's illustrated fold-ins in MAD magazine, Tysdal explores living with mental illness through the medium of the fold-in poem — instead of ending at the bottom of the page, each poem is completed by having the reader fold the page to reveal the last line.

When you can read it: Sept. 27, 2022

Daniel Scott Tysdal is an award-winning writer, filmmaker and teacher. He is the author of three poetry collections, including the ReLit Award-winning Predicting the Next Big Advertising Breakthrough Using a Potentially Dangerous Method. In 2015, he gave a viral-trending TEDx talk, "Everything You Need to Write a Poem (and How It Can Save a Life)." Tysdal teaches at the University of Toronto Scarborough.

Stones to Harvest / Escarmouches de la Chair by Henry Beissel

At left, a photo of writer Henry Beissel smiling at the camera in front of a white backdrop, wearing a black-and-purple print shirt. At right, the cover of his poetry book Stones to Harvest/Escarmouches de la Chair, which features an orange and green graphic painting in the centre of a black background.
Stones to Harvest/Escarmouches de la Chair is a bilingual French/English edition of a poetry collection by Henry Beissel. (Guernica Editions)

Stones to Harvest / Escarmouches de la Chair is a bilingual edition of Henry Bissel's 1993 work. Stones to Harvest / Escarmouches de la Chair is a lyrical cycle of 47 poems set over all four seasons, sketching images inspired by the flora and fauna of eastern Ontario and southern Quebec, where Beissel lived and worked.

When you can read it: Oct. 1, 2022

Henry Beissel is a poet, playwright, fiction writer, translator and editor with more than 30 books published. Among his 23 collections of poetry are Seasons of Blood and Stones to Harvest. Beissel is a distinguished emeritus professor at Concordia University, where he taught English literature for 30 years and founded the creative writing program. He now lives in Ottawa.

The Punishment by Joseph Dandurand

At left, a black-and-white photo of writer Joseph Dandurand wearing a woven hat and dark sunglasses. At right, the cover of his poetry book The Punishment, featuring white text and a white drawing of a hand holding a sword in a bouquet of flowers, set against a black background.
The Punishment is a poetry collection by Kwantlen writer Joseph Dandurand. (Peter Arkell, Nightwood Editions)

B.C. writer Joseph Dandurand returns with The Punishment, a collection rooted in story, with scenes of residential school, the psych ward, the streets and the river. Through his poems, he shares what he sees: the great eagles and small birds; his culture and teachings; Vancouver's East Side; and his Kwantlen community.

When you can read it: Oct. 1, 2022

Joseph Dandurand is a member of the Kwantlen First Nation, east of Vancouver. He is the director of the Kwantlen Cultural Centre and the author of several books of poetry, including 2020's The East Side of It All, which was shortlisted for the Griffin Poetry Prize. In 2021, Dandurand received the BC Lieutenant Governor's Award for Literary Excellence.

First-Time Listener by Jennifer Zilm

First-Time Listener is the third collection of poetry by B.C. writer Jennifer Zilm. (Guernica Editions)

First-Time Listener explores the digitalization of our 21st-century world while reaching back to the past — touching on everything from the Bible to CNN in the process. The collection ends with Lost Time, a long poem that references Proust's Combray in the process of looking back at the author's own youth in Surrey, B.C., exploring the intersections between class, sex, gender and language.

When you can read it: Oct. 1, 2022

Jennifer Zilm is the author of the two previous collections, Waiting Room and The Missing Field.

Sixty-Seven Ontological Studies by Jan Zwicky, with photographs by Robert V. Moody

At left, a photo of writer Jan Zwicky smiling at the camera, wearing black wire-rim glasses, red-and-gold scarf, and brown tweed jacket. In the centre, the book cover for Sixty-Seven Ontological Studies, featuring the title and authors' names in white type and an image of the number '67' in the centre.
Sixty-Seven Ontological Studies is a collaboration between writer Jan Zwicky, left, and photographer Robert V. Moody. (Pearl Pine, Freehand Books, Wendy McKay Moody)

Sixty-Seven Ontological Studies is a collaboration between writer Jan Zwicky and photographer Robert V. Moody, presenting 49 poems and 18 photographs that come together in conversation, offering lyrical reflections on the living world.

When you can read it: Oct. 1, 2022

Jan Zwicky is the author of 20 books of poetry and prose, including Songs for Relinquishing the EarthThe Long Walk, and Wisdom & Metaphor. Her many honours include the Governor General's Literary Award and the Dorothy Livesay Prize, and she was named to the Order of Canada in 2022. She currently lives on the west coast of Canada.

Robert V. Moody is a celebrated photographer and acclaimed mathematician. Born in England but raised in Canada, he now divides his time between Pasadena, Calif., and Victoria. He is an officer of the Order of Canada.

Sheets by Cameron Anstee

On the right, a black-and-white photo of writer Cameron Anstee. He has a beard and is wearing a plaid shirt. On the right, the cover of his poetry book Sheets: Typewriter Works, which features an indigo ink blot on a beige background.
Sheets: Typewriter Works is the second collection of poetry by Ottawa writer Cameron Anstee. (Invisible Publishing)

Prompted by receiving the Olivetti Lettera 30 typewriter that belonged to poet William Hawkins after his death in 2016, the minimalist works in Cameron Anstee's Sheets explore the poetic form through the typewriter as both a machine and mode of composition.

When you can read it: Oct. 4, 2022

Cameron Anstee is the author of one previous collection of poetry, Book of Annotations, and the editor of The Collected Poems of William Hawkins. He is the editor and publisher of Apt. 9 Press and holds a PhD in English literature from the University of Ottawa. He lives in Ottawa.

Wolf Sonnets by R.P. LaRose

Wolf Sonnets is the debut book of poetry from Métis writer R.P. LaRose. (Erin Jade, Véhicule Press)

In Wolf Sonnets, Métis writer R.P. LaRose retools the sonnet's classical form for the current age, reflecting on names, numbers and interconnectedness. Depicting his ancestors as wolves — symbols of survival and protection — LaRose interrogates the inequality, greed and racism at the root of colonialism.

When you can read it: Oct. 6, 2022

R.P. LaRose grew up on the Prairies near Buffalo Lake, Alta., and the boreal foothills of the Rocky Mountains. His poetry has appeared in PRISM International and The Walrus and he was longlisted for the 2016 CBC Poetry Prize. A member of the Métis Nation of Alberta, he currently resides in Amiskwaciy Waskahikan (Edmonton).

Stations of the Crossed by Carol Rose GoldenEagle

On the left, a photo of writer Carol Rose GoldenEagle. She has dark brown hair with heavy bangs and side braids and is looking off to the side in front of a brick wall. On the right is the cover for her poetry book Stations of the Crossed, which features a colourful painting in a square in the middle of a blue background.
Stations of the Crossed is a poetry collection by Cree/Dene writer and artist Carol Rose GoldenEagle. (Inanna Publications)

In Stations of the Crossed, Cree/Dene writer Carol Rose GoldenEagle uses her childhood memory of the church rite "stations of the cross" as a springboard for critical reflection, examining the dark legacy of the residential school system, church and government policies and their ongoing impacts on Indigenous people today.

When you can read it: Oct. 11, 2022

Cree/Dene writer and artist Carol Rose GoldenEagle was appointed Saskatchewan's poet laureate in 2021. She is also the author of the novel Bearskin Diary. Her first book of poetry, Hiraeth, was shortlisted for a Saskatchewan Book Award in 2019. Her latest novel, The Narrows of Fear (Wapawikoscikanik), was published in 2020 and won the 2021 Rasmussen & Co. Indigenous Peoples' Writing Award at the Saskatchewan Book Awards. She lives in Regina Beach.

tend by Kate Hargreaves

On the left, a photo of writer Kate Hargreaves. She is wearing a black top and smiling into the camera. On the right, the cover of her poetry book tend, which features an illustration of carnations and a red and green graphic element superimposed on top.
tend is a poetry collection by Ontario writer Kate Hargreaves. (Oliver Swainson, Book*hug Press)

Kate Hargreaves' second collection, tend, explores the feeling of being distanced from loved ones — both physically and emotionally — and tending to the things that fracture. Through her immersive verse, Hargreaves pulls readers into the space that bodies and language inhabit.

When you can read it: Oct. 13, 2022

Kate Hargreaves is the author of the poetry collection Leak, as well as Jammer Star, a roller-derby novel for young readers. She holds an MA in English and creative writing from the University of Windsor, where she received the Governor General's Gold Medal in Graduate Studies. Hargreaves is also a book designer. She lives and works in Windsor.

Bature! West African Haikai by Richard Stevenson

Bature! West African Haikai is a poetic travel journal by B.C.-based writer Richard Stevenson. (Gepke Stevenson, Mawenzi House)

Bature! West African Haikai is an utaniki, a poetic travel journal comprised of haiku and various other Japanese imagist sequences. The collection documents a Volkswagen journey Richard Stevenson and his family took from northeastern Nigeria down to Lagos and up the west coast of West Africa. Through his poems, Stevenson celebrates life in West Africa — where he lived for two years as a volunteer development worker — before the realities of current violence in the region.

When you can read it: Oct. 15, 2022

Richard Stevenson recently retired to Nanaimo, B.C. after 30 years teaching English and creative writing at Lethbridge College. He has published 30 books and released an album of jazz and poetry. Forthcoming is a lyric/haikai children's collection and he is currently collaborating with his daughter, Marika, on a Vancouver Island photo/haikai project.

Forget-Sadness-Grass by Antony Di Nardo

On the left, a photo of writer Antony Di Nardo sitting in front of some trees. He is wearing a checkered shirt and a black jacket and has his hand on his chin. On the right, the cover of his poetry book Forget-Sadness-Grass, which features bright orange lilies on a black background.
Forget-Sadness-Grass is the sixth poetry collection by Canadian writer Antony Di Nardo. (Ann Di Nardo, Ronsdale Press)

In Forget-Sadness-Grass, Antony Di Nardo takes the reader on a journey through mortality, nostalgia and the cycle of loss and discovery — with the daylily as a key motif and companion. The book takes its name from the Chinese ideogram for that orange flower, which makes its way into poetry that blurs the lines between mysticism and lyricism.

When you can read it: Oct. 15, 2022

Montreal-born Antony Di Nardo is the author of five previous collections of poetry. His work has been translated into several languages and appears widely in journals and anthologies both in Canada and internationally. He has won Exile's Gwendolyn MacEwen Prize for best suite of poems, and was longlisted for the 2020 CBC Poetry Prize.

Refugia by Patrick Horner

Refugia is the debut poetic novel by Canadian writer Patrick Horner. (Francis A. Willey, University of Calgary Press)

Refugia is a poetic novel told through field notes, letters and scientific data. The story follows Emily and Roland as they experience growing shifts in their perception, in their bodies, and even in the flow of linear time — revealing science in all its imperfect beauty.

When you can read it: Oct. 15, 2022

Patrick Horner is a Canadian poet and engineer living in Copenhagen, Denmark, where he works to develop new water treatment technology. He co-wrote and co-produced Waste Dump, a serial radio play, and his poetry and fiction have been published in Wax, Dandelion and Broken Pencil.

The Big Melt by Emily Riddle

On the left, a photo of writer Emily Riddle looking off to the left side, standing in front of a brown brick wall and wearing a blue dress. On the right is the cover of her poetry book The Big Melt, which features yellow square graphics over a wavy blue-and-yellow background.
The Big Melt is the debut poetry collection from Nehiyaw writer Emily Riddle. (Rose-Eva Forgues-Jenkins, Nightwood Editions)

The Big Melt is a debut poetry collection rooted in Nehiyaw thought and urban millennial life events. Part memoir, part research project, it draws on writer Emily Riddle's experience working in Indigenous governance and her own family's experience — demonstrating that governance is as much about interpersonal relationships as it is about law and policy.

When you can read it: Oct. 15, 2022

Emily Riddle is Nehiyaw and a member of the Alexander First Nation (Kipohtakaw). A writer, editor, policy analyst, language learner and visual artist, she lives in Amiskwaciwâskahikan (Edmonton). Her writing has been published intThe Globe and Mail, Teen Vogue, The Malahat Review and Room Magazine. She was shortlisted for the 2020 CBC Poetry Prize, and was awarded the Edmonton Artists' Trust Award in 2021.

How to Hold a Pebble by Jaspreet Singh

On the left, a photo of writer Jaspreet Singh. He is wearing glasses and a black collared shirt and is looking directly into the camera. On the left is the cover of his poetry book How to Hold a Pebble, which features yellow flame-like graphics over a grey background.
How to Hold a Pebble is the second poetry collection by Calgary writer Jaspreet Singh. (Submitted by Jaspreet Singh, NeWest Press)

Jaspreet Singh's second collection of poems, How to Hold a Pebble, engages with memory, place, language and migration, exploring strategies for survival and action amid the realities of colonialization, climate change and other existential issues facing humans in the Anthropocene.

 When you can read it: Oct. 15, 2022

Jaspreet Singh is the author of the novels Helium, Chef and Face, the story collection Seventeen Tomatoes, the poetry collections November and How to Hold a Pebble, and the memoir My Mother, My Translator. He lives in Calgary.

Shapeshifters by Délani Valin

Shapeshifters is a poetry collection by Métis writer Délani Valin. (Nightwood Editions)

In Shapeshifters, Délani Valin explores the cost of finding the perfect mask. Through a lens of urban Métis experience and neurodivergence, Valin takes on a series of personas — including the Starbucks siren, Barbie and the Michelin Man — as an act of empathy as resistance. Her poems explore ways that individuals try to fit into a world that resists them, and argue for shifting the shape of that world instead.

When you can read it: Oct. 15, 2022

Délani Valin is neurodivergent and Métis with Nehiyaw, Saulteaux, French Canadian and Czech ancestry. Her poetry has been awarded The Malahat Review's Long Poem Prize and subTerrain's Lush Triumphant Award. She is on the editorial board of Room and The Malahat Review, and lives on traditional and unceded Snuneymuxw territory (Nanaimo, B.C.).

Scars and Stars by Jesse Thistle

On the left, a photo of writer Jesse Thistle, sitting in front of a leafy bush. He is wearing a denim jacket and smiling directly into the camera. On the right is the cover of his poetry book Scars & Stars, which features gold type and small gold stars over a dark blue background.
Scars & Stars is a poetry collection by bestselling Métis-Cree writer Jesse Thistle. (Natasha Rosa Del Vecchio, McClelland & Stewart)

Jesse Thistle, the author of the bestselling memoir From the Ashes — a Canada Reads 2020 finalist — returns with the poetry collection Scars and Stars. Scars and Stars charts his own history and the stories of people from his past, including the complex legacies of family, parenthood and community.

When you can read it: Oct. 18, 2022

Jesse Thistle is Métis-Cree, from Prince Albert, Sask., and an assistant professor in humanities at York University in Toronto. His memoir, From the Ashes, won the Rakuten Kobo Emerging Writer Prize for Nonfiction, the Indigenous Voices Award, the High Plains Book Award, and was also a finalist on Canada Reads 2020. He lives in Hamilton, Ont.

Pistachios in My Pocket by Sareh Farmand

On the left, a photo of writer Sareh Farmand. She has long black hair and is looking straight ahead. On the right is the cover of her poetry book Pistachios in My Pocket, which features a stylized illustration of a woman facing forward and another smaller girl facing away.
Pistachios in My Pocket is Iranian-Canadian writer Sareh Farmand's debut book of poetry. (Kyrani Kanavaros, At Bay Press)

Sareh Farmand's debut collection, Pistachios in My Pocket, tells the story of her family's escape from Iran and their experiences as immigrants to Canada. Using family anecdotes, memory, public documents and other indelible images to outline her family's story, Pistachios in My Pocket explores themes of loss, home and belonging — recounting the ways immigrants remain haunted after fleeing for safety, and what it means to resettle in a new place.

When you can read it: Oct. 25, 2022

Sareh Farmand was born in Tehran, Iran at the start of the Islamic Revolution, and grew up in Vancouver. Her writing has been published in Sky Island Journal, The Elephant Journal, and Pelak52. She is the co-founder of The Wordshop Collective, a boutique writing and editing firm. Sareh lives in Vancouver.

Derelict Bicycles by Dale Tracy

On the left, a photo of writer Dale Tracy. She has wavy brown hair and is sitting in front of a window at a cafe on a sunny day. On the right is the cover of her poetry book Derelict Bicycles, featuring illustrations of a red bike and a red fox over a beige background.
Derelict Bicycles is B.C. writer Dale Tracy's first full-length poetry collection. (Anvil Press)

In Derelict Bicycles, Dale Tracy mines the intersection between the surreal and the philosophical, drawing on the likes of Samuel Beckett in poems that reveal startling surprises amidst quiet enigmas.

When you can read it: Oct. 30, 2022

Dale Tracy is the author of the chapbooks The Mystery of Ornament and Celebration Machine. Her poetry has appeared in filling Station, Touch the Donkey and The Goose. She is a faculty member in the English department at Kwantlen Polytechnic University.

LVOE by Atticus

At left, a photo of poet Atticus standing in front of shelves of books, wearing a black hoodie and silver mask over his face. At right is the cover of his poetry book LVOE, which features the title written vertically in block letters over a grey background.
LVOE is a collection of poetry by bestselling Instagram poet Atticus. (David Malysheff/CBC, Andrews McMeel Publishing)

Bestselling Instagram poet Atticus's fourth poetry collection, LVOE, uses his immediately recognizable lyrical style for an exploration of self-love, meditation, love and loss, paired with sketches that help bring his words to life.

When you can read it: Nov. 1, 2022

B.C.-raised, California-based New York Times bestselling poet Atticus is a storyteller, traveller and observer who has chosen to remain anonymous, wearing a mask in photographs and at public appearances. He is the author of Love Her WildThe Dark Between Stars and The Truth About Magic. He continues to share his poetry and images on Instagram, where he has 1.6 million followers.

Learned by Carellin Brooks

On the left, a photo of writer Carellin Brooks standing in front of a shelf of books, wearing a pearl necklace and a black blouse. On the right, the cover of her poetry book Learned, which features a vintage-style image of a black-and-yellow bell tower with the title in cursive letters over a dark-blue background.
Learned is a collection of poetry by Vancouver writer Carellin Brooks. (carellinbrooks.com, Book*hug Press)

Learned is set in 1990s London, alternating between the storied quads of Oxford University and queer culture in the recesses of the city's pubs. Carellin Brooks' poems explore pain, permission and pleasure — in the process chronicling an intimate education in bodily memory.

When you can read it: Nov. 1, 2022

Carellin Brooks is the author of One Hundred Days of Rain, which won the 2016 ReLit Award for Fiction and the 2016 Edmund White Award for Debut LGBT+ Fiction. She is also the author of Fresh HellEvery Inch a Woman and Wreck Beach. Brooks lives in Vancouver and is a lecturer at the University of British Columbia.

Canticles III (MMXXII) by George Elliott Clarke

At left, a photo of writer George Elliott Clarke standing in a library. He is wearing glasses and a beige knit sweater and smiling. On the right is the cover of his poetry book Canticles III, featuring white and green text over a purple background.
Canticles III is the continuation of an epic work of poetry by poet and professor George Elliott Clarke. (georgeelliottclarke.net; Guernica Editions)

In 2008, George Elliott Clarke began to write Canticles, an epic poem addressing the Transatlantic slave trade and colonial conquest. In Canticles III (MMXXII), Clarke looks at the history of the African Baptist Association of Nova Scotia, concluding his epic in his own inimitable style.

When you can read it: Nov. 1, 2022

Born and raised in Nova Scotia and now based in Toronto, poet and professor George Elliott Clarke is acclaimed for his narrative lyric suites (Whylah Falls and Execution Poems), his lyric "colouring books" (Blue, Black, Red and Gold), his selected poems (Blues and Bliss), his opera libretti and plays (Beatrice Chancy and Trudeau: Long March, Shining Path). He is an Officer of the Order of Canada and was the poet laureate of Toronto from 2012-2015, among many other honours.

Where the Sea Kuniks the Land by Ashley Qilavaq-Savard

At left, a photo of writer Ashley Qilavaq-Savard. She has long brown hair and is looking off to the right. She is wearing a brown sweater and metal triangular earrings. On the right is the cover of her book Where the Sea Kuniks the Land, which features a photograph of a lake and snow-capped hills.
Where the Sea Kuniks the Land is a poetry collection by Inuk writer and artist Ashley Qilavaq-Savard. (Inhabit Media)

A "kunik" is a traditional Inuit greeting in which someone places their nose on the other's cheek and breathes them in. In Where the Sea Kuniks the Land , Inuk writer Ashley Qilavaq-Savard extends that gesture of love in a collection of poems that celebrates the Arctic landscape and people.

When you can read it: Nov. 1, 2022

Ashley Qilavaq-Savard is an Inuk writer, artist and filmmaker born and raised in Iqaluit, Nunavut. She writes poetry about decolonizing narratives, healing from intergenerational trauma, and love of the land and culture. She has led acting and storytelling workshops for children and youth with the Qaggiavuut Performing Arts Society and the Labrador Creative Arts Festival.

oems by Matthew Tomkinson

On the left is a photo of writer Matthew Tomkinson. He is wearing a collared shirt and glasses and is sitting in front of a lamp and some audio equipment. On the right is the cover of his poetry book oems, which features the title in bronze in a rectangular grid over a black background.
oems is a collection of lipogrammatic poems by B.C. writer and composer Matthew Tomskinson. (matthewtompkinson.com, Guernica Editions)

oems is a collection of 36 lipogrammatic poems composed entirely of flat words which contain no ascending or descending letters. Stemming from Matthew Tomkinson's lived experience of obsessive-compulsive disorder, these poems circle the question of what remains after language has been altered in the compulsive tendencies of expression through writing.

When you can read it: Nov. 1, 2022

Matthew Tomkinson is a writer, composer and doctoral candidate in theatre studies at the University of British Columbia. He is the author of teh chapbook For a Long Time and the co-author of Archaic Torso of Gumby, an experimental short fiction collection.

Dissonance Engine by David Dowker

At left, photo of author David Dowker. He has white hair and is wearing wire-rimmed glasses. At right, the cover of Dowker's poetry book Dissonance Engine, featuring a blue-and-gold image of gear-like machinery.
Dissonance Engine is a collection of poetry by Toronto writer David Dowker. (Book*hug Press)

Dissonance Engine explores time, cognition and loss through prose poems, palindromes, fictional journal entries, a faux manifesto and collage poems.

When you can read it: Nov. 15, 2022

David Dowker was born in Kingston, Ont., but has lived most of his life in Toronto. He was the editor of The Alterran Poetry Assemblage from 1996 to 2004. He is the author of Machine LanguageVirtualis: Topologies of the Unreal, co-written with Christine Stewart, and Mantis.

Love Hurries This by Hamish Guthrie

At left, a black-and-white photo of writer Hamish Guthrie. He has his hand on his chin and is wearing a checkered shirt and wire-rim glasses. At right, the cover of his poetry book Love Hurries This, which features a multicoloured zigzag graphic on a black background.
Love Hurries This is the first collection of poetry by Ontario writer Hamish Guthrie. (Mina Da Costa, At Bay Press)

Love Hurries This, Hamish Guthrie's debut collection, is inspired by past people, places and experiences — including the streets of Toronto where he grew up, childhood summers at a farm outside of Guelph, Ont., and his wife's hometown in Montana. Readers are transported along on the journey through poems evoking the natural world and change of seasons.

When you can read it: Nov. 15, 2022

Hamish Guthrie lives with his wife in Oakville, Ont., where he taught high school English and drama for many years. 

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