Hi, Art

Where in Canada would you find these incredible murals?

In this week's newsletter, we're challenging you to a street art scavenger hunt. Plus, stream Know I'm Here, a CBC doc about the Seawalls Churchill mural festival.

In this week's newsletter, we're challenging you to a street art scavenger hunt

Scene from Know I'm Here. (CBC Docs)

Hello! You're reading the CBC Arts newsletter, and if you like what you see, stick around! Sign up here, and every Sunday we'll send you a fresh email packed with art, culture and a metric truckload of eye candy, hand-picked by our small and mighty team. Here's what we've been talking about this week.

Hi, art lovers!

Where in the country would you find this?

Mural by Winnipeg's Kal Barteski. (Courtesy of CBC Docs)

And this?

Askew One's mural for Seawalls Churchill. (Courtesy of CBC Docs)

And this?

Mural by Jason Botkin. (Courtesy of CBC Docs)

All three are in the same location — chilling in Churchill, Manitoba — and before the weekend, our friends at CBC Docs aired a film about how they came to be.

It's calledKnow I'm Here (stream it anytime), and it was made last summer, when 18 international artists turned up for a festival called SeaWalls Churchill. And, in one of those incredible twists that everyone's favourite documentaries always seem to have, the cameras arrived just as the town was facing a crisis.

Churchill's already the definition of remote. No roads reach this subarctic community, so if you want to get there, you typically have two options: plane or train. Last summer, though, the rail line was destroyed, washed out by spring floods. With no quick solutions, residents were facing food and supply shortages on top of the existential nightmare of being even more isolated from the outside world.

Artists aren't going to build a railway or feed a town, but Churchill also needed hope that summer, and in the film, that's what their murals delivered.

Again, stream it on CBC Docs. We don't give those folks enough shoutouts.

But before you do, let's try that pop quiz again. This time for real.

All through the film, Know I'm Here talks about the real-world value of public art. We've been producing feel-good stories about street artists since CBC Arts launched, so if you've spent any time on our site (or our Instagram), this quiz should be easy like Sunday morning.

All of these murals were painted by artists we've featured. 

Where in Canada would you find them? Email us your best guess!

Artist: birdO

(Instagram/@jerryrugg)

Artist: Ola Volo

(Instagram/@olavolo)

Artist: Andrea Wan

(www.andreawan.com)

Artist: Kevin Ledo

(Instagram/@kevinledo)

Artist: Javid Jah

(Instagram/@javid_jah)

You've got to see this

(Courtesy of Twentytwenty Arts)

20 personal stories about mental health, 1 pop-up art show - If you take transit, you learn to ignore everything from mystery smells to the occasional pigeon, but this art show launching in Toronto's subway wants to grab the attention of commuters and get them talking about mental health. Some of the artists shared the experiences that inspired their designs.

(CBC)

CBC's dusting off its music archives, and it couldn't have happened at a better time - From the Vaults, a show that's putting rarely seen CBC footage back on the air, premiered this week. Come for the "before they were stars" clips — stay for what Amanda Parris writes about here. She's co-hosting the program with q's Tom Power, and according to Amanda, the early days of CBC can teach us a lot about music programming in 2018.

Syrus Marcus Ware (Jalani Morgan/Black Lives Matter TO)

10 trans artists and writers to follow - It's Transgender Awareness Month, so in this week's Queeries column, revisit some of the trans voices we've featured on CBC Arts, from Canada's Top Comic Chanty Marostica to acclaimed artist/activist Syrus Marcus Ware.

Follow this artist

(Courtesy of DaveandJenn)

DaveandJenn (@hermeticferns) - Known separately as David John Foy and Jennifer Saleik, this Calgary duo let us film their incredibly symbiotic collaborative process, and you can gawk at even more of their mutant sculptures and paintings on their website. As Jenn says in the video: "A friend of ours looked at that piece and said, 'I don't know if I want to eat it or if I want to run away screaming.' And that's completely fitting. I like that quite a bit, actually."


Got story ideas? Typo catches?Pics of the best murals where you live?

We're always around. Hit us up over email, and we'll do our best to get back to you.

If you know someone who'd like Hi, Art, we'd really appreciate a forward. We're still starting out, so spreading the word is a big help.

And if someone forwarded you this message, and you like what you've read, here's where to subscribe for more.

Until next week! 

XOXO, CBC Arts

About the Author

Leah Collins

Leah Collins is the Senior Writer at CBC Arts.

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