Arts·ART MINUTE

'Tiny particles to be analyzed': These collages show our humanity through the pixels

Vancouver artist Ed Spence cuts photographs into little pixels and, in reassembling them, aims to show the way our culture can reduce us but we remain human.

Vancouver artist Ed Spence: 'I'm kind of getting back to a humanistic process'

Vancouver artist Ed Spence cuts photographs into little pixels, and in reassembling them aims to show the way our culture can reduce us but we remain human. 0:57

Vancouver artist Ed Spence cuts photographs into little pixels, and in reassembling them aims to show the way our culture can reduce us. It can be "dehumanizing" — but Spence wants to show the way we're human through it.

"Everything can be kind of boiled down to a different set of information or a different way of interpreting it," he says. "All these images, whether they be a pile of garbage or a beautiful rose, it all just gets reduced down to these tiny little particles of information to be transmitted and analyzed."

(Ed Spence)

"And in some respect, we're all kind of being dehumanized in a way with the corporations controlling the data analytics. I feel like I'm kind of getting back to a humanistic process."

(CBC Arts)

Art Minute is a CBC Arts series taking you inside the minds of Canadian artists to hear what makes them tick and the ideas behind their work.

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