Arts

The next generation of coming-of-age movies is here, and they're being helmed by women

In an inspiring conversation, Amanda Parris talks in-depth with Rama Rau (Honey Bee), Nicole Dorsey (Black Conflux) and Melanie Oates (Body & Bones).

In an inspiring conversation, Amanda Parris talks in-depth with Rama Rau, Nicole Dorsey and Melanie Oates

Left to right: Rama Rau, Melanie Oates, Nicole Dorsey. (CBC Arts)

Making your first feature is hard. For these women, hard might be an understatement.

During this year's St. John's International Women's Film Festival, the fest partnered with CBC Arts and the Directors Guild Of Canada to host a special edition of their Visionaries event featuring an all-female panel of first-time feature-length filmmakers bringing their movies to Newfoundland. In an inspiring conversation, Rama Rau (Honey Bee), Nicole Dorsey (Black Conflux), Melanie Oates (Body & Bones) and host Amanda Parris talk in-depth about power crying, toxic masculinity and the power of the female protagonist.

For 30 years, SJIWFF has been showcasing women working in film, television and digital industries. One of the highlights of this year's festival was the coming together of the next wave of Canadian filmmakers, who shared their struggles to make their first film. As part of an evening that concluded with a masterclass by Helen Shaver, Amanda — armed with her trademark curiosity — got a glimpse of what the future of Canadian films could be, and affirmation the future is female.

Watch the panel:

The Filmmakers host Amanda Parris speaks with first-time filmmakers Rama Rau, Nicole Dorsey and Melanie Oates at the St. John's International Women's Film Festival. 43:29

Watch The Filmmakers on CBC Gem.