Arts·Video

'Sound waves are the furthest extension of ourselves': Why Alysha Brilla aims to heal with music

For the Brampton folk musician, music (and food) is medicine.

For the Brampton folk musician, music (and food) is medicine

'Sound waves are the furthest extension of ourselves': Why Alysha Brilla aims to heal with music

CBC Arts

2 months ago
4:37
For the Brampton folk musician, music (and food) is medicine. 4:37

Unable to tour this year with the COVID-19 pandemic, Brampton musician Alysha Brilla turned her focus elsewhere: using food, herbs, and spices to heal the body, spending time in nature writing, and creating her latest album Circle. Set for release this fall, Circle is a collection of songs that speak to our connection to ourselves, each other, and the planet by way of biology and spirituality. The music and lyrics are influenced by Brilla's Indo-Tanzanian spirituality, her experiences with autoimmune challenges, and climate change.

Brilla also recently opened The Frequency Portal to provide an online learning and healing space for artistic souls. The project is a digital realm full of classes and workshops, as well as discussions about the science of creativity and self-expression, the physics of sound, and how all of these things relate to our wellness and humanity.

In this video, filmmakers Jaime Leigh Gianopoulos and Cláudio Cruz spend an afternoon in Alysha's world. We take a peek behind the scenes while she produces one of her singles "The Body" and cooks traditional food inspired by her heritage, which connects her to a lineage where food, music, and nature play a powerful role in the balance that modern culture can often disrupt. 

Alysha Brilla playing guitar at home. (CBC Arts)

Beyond the beautiful harmonic vocals and contemporary beats Alysha weaves into her music, she also spends time studying the science of sound, investigating how sound waves impact our physical and neurological health. 

"Sound waves are the furthest extension of ourselves that we can create," she says. "That's why it feels so good to sing. Sound waves travel further than the heat our bodies emit and the electromagnetic field of our hearts. That vibrational energy and the power of communication that extends the furthest is also one of the most immediately affecting of all phenomena."

As a visionary musical artist, Brilla's experimentation through her craft not only entertains but also encourages us to heal. As the world faces the many challenges it is up against — the climate crisis, global pandemics, political and social injustices — healing music plays a powerful role in supporting people to overcome and grow in the process of change and transition.

Alysha Brilla recording. (CBC Arts)

Find out more about Alysha Brilla and hear her music on her website alyshabrilla.com.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Jaime Leigh Gianopoulos (she/her) is an award-winning director, producer/impact producer, editor and founder of BC-based production company Her Stories Inc. Jaime Leigh’s projects primarily concern the empowerment of women+, social and environmental justice. Her most recent film "What About Our Future?" screened at festivals worldwide, was distributed on Hollywood Suite and played in over 370 classrooms as a part of the 'Hot Doc's Doc's For School Program' (2021). The film won the 'Nigel Moore Youth Programming Award' at DOXA (2021.)

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