Arts·THROUGH THE EYES

Live a day as a dancer through the eyes of one of the National Ballet of Canada's finest

Toronto ballet dancer Giorgio Galli strapped on a GoPro to show us a day in his life for the inaugural edition of our new series Through The Eyes.

Toronto ballet dancer Giorgio Galli strapped on a GoPro to show us a day in his life

Toronto ballet dancer Giorgio Galli strapped on a GoPro to show us a day in his life. 1:48

At the age of 13, Giorgio Galli took his first ballet class in a small town in Northern Italy. Six years of rigorous training in Milan and London later, an audition for the National Ballet of Canada in Stuttgart, Germany would ultimately bring him to Toronto, where he now lives a life as a professional ballet dancer.

From breakfast to ballet class to his bike ride home, Galli gave CBC Arts intimate access into that life by strapping on a GoPro for an entire day — and filmmaker Jordan Lee crafted the footage into a minute a half. The result is essentially as close to a simulation of ballet dancer life as they come.

"Dancing is my life, a passion that I was lucky enough to make into work and I am grateful to be surrounded by beautiful and inspiring artists every day," Galli says. "Ultimately being onstage, performing to a live orchestra in front of thousands of people is one of the most rewarding, fulfilling and enriching part of my work."

You can catch Galli live as he performs with the National Ballet of Canada in Nijinsky from November 22-26 and The Nutcracker, December 9-30.

Through The Eyes is a series of short films that provide a first person perspective on what it's like to live a day in the life of an artist. From dancers to tattooists, these films give an immersive and intimate peak into how one lives, breathes and expresses art.

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