This photography school in Lagos' floating slum Makoko is empowering kids to change their community

Life in Makoko is precarious — not just because the city is built on stilts over water, but because the government has tried to demolish it.

The Silent Majority Project helps kids 'tell their own story'

This photography school in Lagos' floating slum Makoko is empowering kids to change their community. The Silent Majority Project helps kids 'tell their own story'. 1:53

Stream the full new Lagos episode now!

Life in Makoko is precarious — not just because the city is built on stilts over water, but because the government has tried to demolish it.

Without arts and without initiatives such as The Silent Majority Project, there would be no Makoko today. The government could have come in and cleared them out.- Adolphus Opara , artist and initiator of The Silent Majority Project

Telling the community's story through photography. (Interrupt This Program)

Artist and photographer Adolphus Opara helped to initiate The Silent Majority Project in Makoko alongside artist and children's rights advocate Olusola Otori with the goal of educating and empowering kids through photography. In the video above, CBC Arts' Interrupt This Program visits the canals of Makoko and Adolphus' photography class at Whanyinna primary school.

The idea of The Silent Majority Project is empowering these kids to tell their own story of their own community.- Adolphus Opara

Adolphus Opara: artist, photographer and initiator of The Silent Majority Project. (Interrupt This Program)

Freelance photographer Anthony Monday considers Opara a mentor. "Without this project, man, I wouldn't call myself an artist," he says. Monday's work has been published nationally and internationally, and he is going to university — which Opara says is rare in Makoko, where not many people receive education beyond primary school. 

Children listen in Adolphus Opara's photography class at Whanyinna primary school in Makoko. (Interrupt This Program)

In this, Opara sees hope for the precarious Makoko: "Imagine we have five more Anthonys. Eventually one becomes government, head of this place. There will be change in Makoko."

Moscow. Jerusalem. Lagos. Havana. Manila. Cities under pressure. Artists fighting back. The International Emmy-nominated series Interrupt This Program returns to CBC February 5th. 2:09

Art as political protest, as a means of survival, as an agent of change, as a display of courage and delight. Interrupt This Program explores art in cities under pressure. 

Stream the full episode from Lagos now.

Watch Season 1 now streaming online with episodes from Beirut, Kiev, Port-au-Prince, Medellín and Athens.

Video edited by Benoit Salin.

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