Arts·COVID Residencies

Finish him! With art supplies in NL running low, Lily Taylor is making papier mâché wrestlers

COVID-19 has limited the number of supplies being shipped to art stores in St. John's — but she isn't letting that hold her back.

COVID-19 has limited the supplies being shipped to art stores — but she isn't letting that hold her back

Finish him! With art supplies in NL running low, Lily Taylor is making papier mâché wrestlers

CBC Arts

1 year ago
3:37
COVID-19 has limited the number of supplies being shipped to art stores in St. John's — but she isn't letting that hold her back. 3:37

In our self-shot video series COVID Residencies, we're checking out how artists are adapting their practices in isolation, whether it's diving into different processes or getting lost in their sketchbooks.

Due to COVID-19, there has been a limit on the number of supplies being shipped to art stores in St. John's, Newfoundland — so local illustrator and multidisciplinary artist Lily Taylor decided to utilize materials she had in her home. Enter: papier mâché.

"I think it's a meditative practice for me, using my hands to build something from my sketchbook into real life," she says. In the image below, her painting is realized into a 3D shape. 

Hulk Hogan. (Lily Taylor)

Taylor has recently been focusing on wrestling.  "I think the whole programming is very theatre-like, which I love...definitely an escape from reality." In this video, she shows us her papier mâché process for another iconic wrestling related image: "Macho Man" Randy Savage's flying elbow drop. 

Uncertainty tends to be the consensus feeling among society and artists alike during this pandemic. Taylor believes that art can help smooth out these uncertain feelings. "I think art is very important in times like these because it brings us together as a community to learn, to feel, to imagine, to create and most importantly to laugh."

Follow Lily Taylor here and keep a lookout for the stories we're bringing you from other artists in isolation as part of COVID Residencies. Stay safe, friends!

(Lily Taylor)

CBC Arts understands that this is an incredibly difficult time for artists and arts organizations across this country. We will do our best to provide valuable information, share inspiring stories of communities rising up and make us all feel as (virtually) connected as possible as we get through this together. If there's something you think we should be talking about, let us know by emailing us at cbcarts@cbc.ca. See more of our COVID-related coverage here.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

As a young child, March Mercanti would play with his action figures for countless hours because he was obsessed with telling stories...to himself. Currently, March is a filmmaker living in Toronto, ON. He works at CBC Arts creating documentaries for artists across Canada.

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