Exhibitionists·Video

When city life gets too demanding, this artist meditates...by turning flowers into insects

Meet Montreal's Raku Inoue, whose floral art practice went viral — and taught him that sometimes work gets better when you're not aiming for success.

Meet Montreal's Raku Inoue, whose floral art practice went viral

When city life gets too demanding, this artist meditates...by turning flowers into insects

5 years ago
Duration 3:20
Raku Inoue's floral art taught him that sometimes work gets better when you're not aiming for success.

Multimedia designer Raku Inoue was tired of the precise demands of his ad agency work. So he decided to make an exercise for himself to find some creative freedom. What he devised was ambitious: to make intricate insects out of flora he finds in his Montreal garden. Through this process, Inoue is able to achieve a more spontaneous state of mind while respecting nature.

The results — tiny insects made out of petals, leaves and branches — went viral when Inoue posted them online. And this series of objects have become his most in-demand work. Inoue has quickly realized that sometimes, work gets better when you're not aiming for success but trying to connect to something more essential.

(CBC Arts)

In this video, you'll follow Inoue through an afternoon as he collects his materials and makes an insect, all with his dog by his side. 

Follow Raku Inoue here — his winter series will begin soon.

Watch CBC Arts: Exhibitionists on Friday nights at 12:30am (1am NT) and Sundays at 3:30pm (4pm NT) on CBC Television.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Ashley Duong is a Montreal-based filmmaker and multimedia storyteller. Her most recent projects include Land and Legends, an interactive journey into a legendary river valley in Borneo, and A Time To Swim, a feature documentary.

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