Exhibitionists·Video

See Peaches recreate Yoko Ono's legendary "Cut Piece" performance

When Peaches met fellow firestarter Yoko Ono and reenacted a notorious art piece, she faced feeling pretty vulnerable. In this installment of our Storytellers series on Exhibitionists, the Canadian pop treasure — whose highly anticipated album Rub is out now, and it's a scorcher — opens up about what it was like to be on stage in a totally new way.

The famously incendiary performer describes feeling unusually vulnerable

Electronic musician Peaches on art and danger

6 years ago
3:14
Peaches tells her story of meeting fellow provocateur Yoko Ono 3:14

Peaches has always been brave enough speak her mind. The electronic musician and performer is known for being bold, provocative and daring ever since she burst into the public consciousness in 2000 with her album The Teaches of Peaches, which was recently named best Canadian album of the 2000s in the inaugural Slaight Family Polaris Heritage Prize. She's worked with Pink, Christina Aguilera, and Major Lazer (among many others), and her songs are full of raw lyrics on subjects ranging from sex to politics.

But when Peaches met fellow firestarter Yoko Ono and reenacted "Cut Piece," arguably the pioneering figure's most notorious art performance, she faced feeling pretty vulnerable. In this installment of our  Storytellers  series on  Exhibitionists , the Canadian pop treasure — whose highly anticipated album Rub is out now, and it's a scorcher — opens up about what it was like to be on stage in a totally new way.

Watch Exhibitionists Sunday at 4:30pm (5pm NT) on CBC Television.

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