Video

Pansexual, polyamorous and posthuman: Jessica Sallay-Carrington's sculptures are smashing stigmas

NFSW: These powerful sculptures also contain graphic depictions of sex — don't say we didn't warn you!

NFSW: These powerful sculptures also contain graphic depictions of sex — don't say we didn't warn you!

Jessica Sallay-Carrington. (CBC Arts)

Jessica Sallay-Carrington is an artist, a feminist and a traveller. And all three of those qualifiers make their way into her work — her sculptures are imaginative, fearless and frankly sexual. The artist asserts that the sculptures are inspired by real experiences from her life and adventures. But the carnal depictions in her work aren't meant to sensationalize; as Sallay-Carrington says, "Personal expression and freedom to be whoever you want to be and gender identity — they're all tied into my work."

Watch the video:

CONTENT WARNING: The video below contains graphic depictions of consensual sex. You might want to wait until you get home from work to watch it.

NFSW: These powerful sculptures also contain graphic depictions of sex - don't say we didn't warn you! Filmmaker: Duncan McDowall 2:38

In the above video by filmmaker Duncan McDowall, you get to see inside Sallay-Carrington's studio, where she shows you her posthuman sculptures and opens up about how her focus on female sexuality gradually led to these metamorphic creatures. And she'll tell you how her sculptural practice has also become an exercise in empowerment.

See Jessica Sallay-Carrington's work at The Rose Festival in Montreal from May 11-13.

Jessica Sallay-Carrington. (CBC Arts)

Watch CBC Arts: Exhibitionists online or on CBC Television. Tune in Friday nights at 11:30pm (12am NT) and Sundays at 3:30pm (4pm NT).

About the Author

Lise Hosein

Lise Hosein is a producer at CBC Arts. Before that, she was an arts reporter at JazzFM 91, an interview producer at George Stroumboulopoulos Tonight and a PhD candidate at the University of Toronto. When she's not at her CBC Arts desk she's sometimes an instructor at OCADU and is always quite terrified of bees.

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