Exhibitionists·Video

From a bike tour to live-scoring his graphic novel, how Kid Koala is taking his work to the next level

Want to see Kid Koala spin? There are some very compelling alternatives to buying a concert ticket.

The turntablist/DJ/graphic novelist is finding inventive new ways to connect to his audience

Kid Koala takes you on a whirlwind journey through three of his many projects

Exhibitionists

5 years ago
4:15
In addition to being known for his infectiously good-spirited tracks and his energetic live performances, the DJ and graphic novelist is finding new ways to connect with his audience. 4:15

Kid Koala never sleeps. At least, that's what we imagine. Because in addition to being known for his infectiously good-spirited tracks and his energetic live performances, the turntablist/DJ/graphic novelist is finding new ways to connect with his audience.

In this segment directed by Marco Libretti during the Luminato Festival in Toronto, Kid Koala takes you on a tour of three of his new works: a bicycle tour called 66 Wheels; a concert for you to work during (Music to Draw To), and a performance of his own graphic novel Nufonia Must Fall, which he scores live while it's performed by puppets.

Why does he do it? As he'll tell you in this video, Kid Koala sees his audience as part of his shows. And that's important to him. "It's not just spectator and performer anymore," he says. "I think now, more than anything, it's this ability to all be in a room together and create something together."

See Kid Koala perform Nufonia Must Fall in Montreal from September 2-5, or catch his solo DJ set in Guelph on September 16. Kid Koala also created the score for Minotaur, an immersive film by Munro Ferguson that's screening at the TIFF's Pop 03 VR festival in Toronto until August 21.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

Become a CBC Member

Join the conversationCreate account

Already have an account?

now