Crash Gallery

'I'm impressed that no one's thrown up yet': Crash Gallery artists paint upside-down

The artists battle gravityas they paint audience portraits upside down, with the light-headed winners facing off in a futuristic digital graffiti wall challenge.

With time ticking down, the artists keep painting through this strenuous challange

"I'm impressed that no one's thrown up yet." 0:23

Stream the full Crash Gallery episode now!

Ambidextrous artist Jace Kim, illustrator Tori Swanson, and painter Arlana Green battle gravity and the clock to paint revealing audience portraits while suspended upside down. Two light-headed winners advance to the final, where futuristic digital graffiti wall awaits.

Watch episode 3 of season 2 of Crash Gallery this Sunday at 9:30pm to see just how good these artists are at painting with their world flipped around.

Meet the artists

(Crash Gallery)

Tori Swanson — For Tori Swanson, drawing a nude portrait promotes liberation and healthy body image. Her primary focus is on nude commission portraits with charcoal, or as she puts it: "I see a lot of naked people on the regular." Watch Tori talk about the liberation that comes through the vulnerability of being painted nude.

(Crash Gallery)

Arlana Green — Arlana connected to art in her childhood: "I was really shy as a child, and I found art was a really good way to express myself without having to speak." Now Arlana is "really focused on bringing awareness to black issues." She feels that art is a "a great conversation piece for that and a way that people can come together in a really positive and loving way." Watch Arlana talk about bringing people together through art, and representing black children in storybooks.

(Crash Gallery)

Jace Kim — When Jace Kim moved to Canada as a teenager, art helped him overcome the language barrier. Through art, Jace found a way back to interacting with other people: "People knew me as 'oh that kid with drawing skill'." Watch Jace talk about how drawing dragons led to him making friends.


Crash Gallery is back for a second season. In each episode, three talented artists of various disciplines go head-to-head against each other in a real-time creative arena, giving the audience a front row seat to the creative process.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.