Arts·The Move

B-boy Lazylegz pushes the limits of dance with his 'ill-ability'

Luca "Lazylegz" Patuelli was born with a neuromuscular disorder — and he uses it to breakdance like no one else in the world.

Luca Patuelli was born with a neuromuscular disorder — and he uses it to breakdance like no one else

Luca "Lazylegz" Patuelli is dancing as part of the new CBC Arts series The Move. Over the coming weeks, we will introduce you to six dancers, each of whom will invite you into their routines, providing a deeper understanding of the movements that hold personal significance for them.

For Luca "Lazylegz" Patuelli, there is no such thing as a disability — only ill-abilities. In his words, "'ill-abilities' means incredible abilities." It's a way of viewing difference not as a weakness to hide behind but as a powerful thing to be celebrated.

Watch the video:

"Instead of ruminating on the things he could not do, Luca decided to innovate." 4:39

Luca embodies this idea, continually pushing his strongest attributes to the limit to dance like no other person in the world. See, Luca is a b-boy who was born with arthrogryposis, a neuromuscular disorder which causes curved joints and muscle shortening. It has severely hindered the way in which he can move and subjected him to multiple surgeries over the course of his life.

But instead of ruminating on the things he could not do, Luca decided to innovate. So while his friends practiced their footwork, he figured out a way to use his core and upper body strength to his advantage, crafting a style of breakdancing that you truly have to see to believe.

The minute I hear the music I completely forget about my difference or my 'ill-ability' and I just end up being like everyone else.- Luca "Lazylegz" Patuelli , dancer

In this episode of our new series The Move, Luca shows us his elbow spin. It's a move that was born out of a crash — and in true Lazylegz fashion, he made it into his signature move. How ill is that?

"When I hit the move successfully, I feel like I move the way I always wanted to move."

Watch the first episode of The Move featuring Siphesihle November, who never expected to have the life as a ballet dancer and now at 19 is the youngest company member of the National Ballet of Canada.

Watch the second episode of The Move featuring Nivedha Ramalingham, who started dancing bharatanatyam when she was just 5 years old and now she has her own school of dance.

About the Author

Lucius Dechausay is a video producer at CBC Arts, as well as a freelance illustrator and filmmaker. His short films and animations have been screened at a number of festivals including The Toronto International Film Festival and Hot Docs. Most recently he directed KETTLE, which is currently streaming at CBC Short Docs.

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