Arts·ART MINUTE

As headlines rush past him, he turns to the 'genuine slowness' of painting

For Vancouver-based painter, sculptor and installation artist Chad Murray, "painting is a beach" — a way for him to find a true sense of calm in a hectic world.

For Vancouver-based artist Chad Murray, 'painting is a beach'

As headlines rush past him, he turns to the 'genuine slowness' of painting

5 years ago
Duration 0:59
For Vancouver-based artist Chad Murray, 'painting is a beach.'

Chad Murray is a Vancouver-based painter, sculptor and installation artist. His work is infused with humour and he recently crowdfunded a skydiving trip to inspire a series of skydiving paintings. He has shown locally and internationally in a number of group and solo exhibitions. Murray was also the winner of the 2014 Frontlines Competition for emerging artists. He is also one of the founding members of Sunset Terrace, an innovative art collective and gallery located in East Vancouver.

(Chad Murray)
There isn't a lot of emphasis on slowness these days.- Chat Murray, artist

While Murray thinks the idea of slowness is often romanticized — like in his hometown of Chilliwack, B.C., where he says the small town aesthetic is used as "a way to sell condos" — painting and making art allows him to find a sense of calm that feels more genuine.

(Chad Murray)


Art Minute is a new CBC Arts series taking you inside the minds of Canadian artists to hear what makes them tick and the ideas behind their work.

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