Arts·COVID Residencies

Alex Coma's massive celestial tapestry uses sacred geometry to 'manifest the future'

What do you get when you combine spirituality, celestial interest and art? The human temple of Alex Coma.

Isolation has allowed the Montreal-based artist to connect more deeply with his 'spiritual landscapes'

Alex Coma's massive celestial tapestry uses sacred geometry to 'manifest the future'

CBC Arts

9 months ago
3:44
What do you get when you combine spirituality, celestial interest and art? The human temple of Alex Coma. 3:44

In our self-shot video series COVID Residencies, we're checking out how artists are adapting their practices in isolation, whether it's diving into different processes or getting lost in their sketchbooks.

What do you get when you combine spirituality, celestial interest and art? The human temple of Alex Coma.

The Montreal-based painter, sculptor and installation artist defines his work as "spiritual landscapes." He uses photography to create source images for himself, then meditates on them for a long period of time in order to visualize the work's potential. Coma was already a deep-minded individual before the pandemic, and once it hit he got even deeper. "All these days in isolation has allowed me to delve deeper in my inner world and inner spirituality and, in this sense, integrate it more harmoniously with my art."

(Alex Coma)

During isolation, Coma has created a large celestial tapestry based on his study of sacred geometry, which involves assigning meaning to the geometric proportions of forms of creation and their mathematical elements. "It's very fascinating to see how everything is not as complex as it seems," he says. (If you Google "sacred geometry," you might want to commit an hour or so — I may or may not have fallen into that rabbit realm of mind-blowing knowledge.)

In this video, witness Coma's tapestry journey from process to final creation. You can also watch him take a "colour bath," do an impressive handstand and even meditate.

Ultimately, Coma believes that artists can paint the future. "As artists we have the powerful tool of creation, which allows us to manifest the future, bring new ideas to this physical realm," he says. "I think it's important to give more thought to this."

You can follow Coma's work here.

(Alex Coma)

CBC Arts understands that this is an incredibly difficult time for artists and arts organizations across this country. We will do our best to provide valuable information, share inspiring stories of communities rising up and make us all feel as (virtually) connected as possible as we get through this together. If there's something you think we should be talking about, let us know by emailing us at cbcarts@cbc.ca. See more of our COVID-related coverage here.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

As a young child, March Mercanti would play with his action figures for countless hours because he was obsessed with telling stories...to himself. Currently, March is a filmmaker living in Toronto, ON. He works at CBC Arts creating documentaries for artists across Canada.

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