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Kluane National Park under threat from mining

The Story


For sheer majesty, Yukon's Kluane National Park matches any in the world. Its striking layout features Mount Logan, Canada's highest peak, as well as stunning glaciers, extensive ice fields and delicate flora and fauna. But Kluane has also long been in danger of damage from the mining industry. Biologist John Theberge notes that although there's not much gold to be found in the park, prospectors are free to keep trying. "Archaic legislation in the Yukon really puts mining first," he says in this 1975 report from CBC-TV's This Land.

Medium: Television
Program: This Land
Broadcast Date: Feb. 5, 1975
Guest(s): John Theberge
Host: Laurie Jennings
Duration: 18:42
This clip was edited for copyright reasons.

Did You know?


• Kluane National Park Reserve was established by the government of Canada in 1972. According to the Parks Canada website, it covers an area of 21,980 square kilometres (about 8,486 square miles).

• Kluane is part of an international parks system that also includes Tatshenshini-Alsek Provincial Park in British Columbia and Alaska's Wrangell - St. Elias National Park and Preserve and Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve.

• In 1979, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) designated Kluane / Wrangell-St. Elias a World Heritage site. It added Glacier Bay in 1992 and Tatshenshini-Alsek in 1994.

• John Theberge's insights are the focus of this report. Theberge was a professor and researcher in the Faculty of Environmental Studies at the University of Waterloo from 1972 to 2000. He and his co-researcher and wife, Mary, received international recognition for their work with timber wolves. In 1993, Equinox magazine named them "Environmentalist of the Year." In 1998, they received the Harkin Medal from Canadian Parks and Wilderness Services.

 


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