Cost of Living

Tax breaks for married senior citizens aren't fair, according to older single Canadians

Lobby group pushes for changes to pension income splitting

Posted: May 09, 2021

When it comes to tax breaks, married and common-law seniors save more than their single friends, prompting a new group to lobby for tax fairness in Canada. (Getty Images/Image Source)

Show more
Canadian seniors who are married or in a common-law relationship can take advantage of income splitting — a tax advantage that their single counterparts say isn't fair to those who are aging without a spouse. Producer Anis Heydari looks into why single seniors want, what they call, a more level playing field.  9:00

Canadian seniors who are married or in common-law relationships can take advantage of income splitting — a tax advantage that their single counterparts say isn't fair to those who are aging without a partner.

With the number of single people in Canada continuing to grow in many age categories, the concept of single seniors paying more per household in taxes than their married neighbours may become increasingly unpopular.

A new lobby group, Single Seniors for Tax Fairness, is trying to raise awareness about the issue. And while the recent federal budget did increase some Old Age Security (OAS) benefits, they only apply to seniors over the age of 75.

ADVERTISEMENT

Producer Anis Heydari looks into why single seniors want what they call "a more level playing field", and explains why The Golden Girls should have gotten married to save on their taxes. That is, if Blanche, Sophia, Dorothy and Rose all lived in Regina instead of Miami.


Listen to the segment above  — or download and subscribe to the Cost of Living podcast.