Canada 2017·So, Canada...

Canada is heating up — literally. What else is changing with a warming climate?

By the end of this century, climate change will have noticeably altered Canada's agriculture, habitats and landscapes.

Water levels, endangered species, temperatures. Higher numbers aren't always good.

By the end of this century, climate change will have noticeably altered Canada's agriculture, habitats and landscapes. (Topley Studio / Library and Archives Canada / PA-008786)

So, Canada...: Canadian writers, musicians, educators, poets and leaders riff on big and little topics inspired by our anthem's lyrics. 

(Emma Segal)

By 2100, even if the world's temperature increases by only 2°C, Canada's will increase by 4°C. 

Agriculture, habitats and landscapes are changing. Beavers are plugging up fishing creeks in Tuktoyaktuk, N.W.T. and lakes in the Northwest Territories have doubled in size. B.C. fruit crops are spreading north, trees are disappearing from the prairies and water has claimed one square kilometre of Lennox Island, P.E.I.

By 2081, Canada might have as many as three extra weeks of summery weather.

By the end of the 21st century, twice as much land in Canada will be burned by forest fires each year. Between 2005 and 2015, the annual average was 2.4 million hectares. By 2100, that could mean approximately 5 million hectares per year will be burned by forest fire.

751 animal species are currently at risk of extinction, in part due to climate change, including the Atlantic walrus, the kangaroo rat and Harris' sparrow.

Sources: 

Infographic designed by Emma Segal.

Next in So, Canada...: Natan Obed's take on "true north strong and free:" 

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