Becoming Canadian

For new citizen Ngozi Otti, parenting in Canada required adaptation from what she was used to in Nigeria

Ngozi Otti was born in Nigeria and lives in Halifax. She became a Canadian citizen on August 18, 2016 in Halifax, N.S. The cultural differences between Nigeria and Canada became for Ngozi to adapt to, especially while raising children.

"Children ask you why and you have to go through the horrendous experience of trying to explain to them."

This story is part of Becoming Canadian, a year-long project sharing stories of struggle and triumph from new Canadian citizens.

"Being a mother in Canada is tough. Back home [in Nigeria] you got a lot of support. Here, between understanding childcare policies and rules, it's a learning experience. The values that I really want to instill into my children are different, so you find yourself in conflict. Then your kids go to school and they get education and then they come home and they have lots of questions and confusions."

[Back home] I don't have to negotiate with my child for my child to listen to what I'm saying. 

"[Back home] I don't have to negotiate with my child for my child to listen to what I'm saying. I tell you stuff, you do it. But here, children ask you why, and you have to go through the horrendous experience of trying to explain to them and convince them. That is the experience of every Canadian mom."

— Ngozi Otti, born in Nigeria. Lives in Halifax, became a Canadian citizen on August 18, 2016 in Halifax, N.S. 

To find more stories about the struggles and triumphs of new Canadian citizens, follow Canada 2017 on Facebook and @BecomingCDN on Instagram and Twitter.

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