The FWA Mobile of The Day













Loading

Click or tap to begin
Watch the Full Episode
Watch the Interview

Making Wild Canada reveals how the intrepid and adventurous film crews went nose to nose with ice covered grizzly bears near the Arctic Circle, spent frigid nights on a frozen lake in Quebec to get just a few underwater shots of beavers coming and going from their lodge, and underwater and topside crews braved Newfoundland’s notoriously bad weather to shoot 18-metre long humpback whales. In a wide-ranging conversation, Jeff Turner shares his love of wildlife filmmaking, and some of the secrets of the trade that he’s picked up after 30 years in a challenging, but exhilarating line of work.

Watch the full episode
Lighting the lake
Noranda, Québec
Kieran O'Donovan

Wild Canada was a team effort between Canada’s top wildlife filmmaking team at River Road Films and the UK’s Brian Leith Productions. Between them they have many decades of experience working on some of the world’s most prestigious, award-winning wildlife series including Planet Earth and Human Planet.

Producer Phil Chapman (right) brought with him over twenty years experience travelling around the world while working at BBC’s Natural History Unit. This time he toured Canada’s heartland filming sequences for Wild Canada’s third episode.

Cameraman Andrew Manske and producer Phil Chapman
Elk Island, Alberta
Emma Fraser
Vancouver cinematographer Justin Maguire travelled from coast to coast - to coast for two years filming spectacular scenes of wildlife. He often got right into the centre of the action... and up close to some of Canada’s more iconic species.
Justin Maguire
Gribbell Island, British Columbia
Kieran O'Donovan
Kermode bear
Gribbell Island, British Columbia
Kieran O'Donovan
Lead researcher Elisabeth Oakham was key in finding new stories: pulling information from recent scientific research, oral histories, and observers in the field to help tell Canada's unique natural history. She also planned shoots, assisted on location and verified the facts. Elisabeth Oakham
Quadra Island, British Columbia
Sacha Miroeff

Yukoner Kieran O'Donovan was one busiest people on the team. His background as a biologist came in handy when it came to actually locating the animals.

As cinematographer-in-training he helped set up the gear, recorded extra footage for the film AND took many of the photos for the website!

Kieran O'Donovan
Nunavut
Kieran O'Donovan

Producer Sacha Mirzoeff (left), now a top executive at the BBC, was one of the team members from the UK group.

One standout experience in his months of travelling across Canada was telling the surprising story of how the Laich-Kwil-Tach expanded mudflats along BC's coast to create the perfect environment to grow clams and other seafood - an early form of farming.

Sasha Mirozoeff, Justin Maguire, actor
Quadra Island, British Columbia
Amanda McNaughton

A big part of the series was the historical recreations to show how humans played an integral role in shaping Canada’s landscapes and wildlife.

Researcher Chelsea Turner paid meticulous attention; locating the best settings, hiring actors and finding the correct clothing, makeup and hair style. The team wanted even the smallest details to be as accurate as possible.

Making nature films is a lifelong Turner family passion. Chelsea now works with her father, series director, Jeff Turner.
Cheslea Turner with actor
Quadra Island, British Columbia
Amanda McNaughton
Chelsea Turner, Jeff Turner, actors
Cardston, Alberta
Amanda McNaughton

British associate producer Ben Wallis suffered through endless cold Canadian nights to film the beavers swimming underwater.

He was integral is selecting some of the key stories that Wild Canada told; like the infamous red-sided garter snake orgy in Narcisse, Manitoba.

Ben Wallis
Noranda, Québec
Ben Wallis
Alberta based cinematographer Andrew Manske also contributed many scenes to the series. He spent 72-hour shifts over many days in a blind to capture footage of Logan, a giant male wolverine, in his element. It was the first time wolverines had been filmed in HD and in the wild in North America.
Andrew Manske
Elk Island, Alberta
Phil Chapman

And of course, acclaimed series director Jeff Turner, who after a thirty year career of filming wildlife all over the world, finally had the opportunity to focus his talents on his homeland - Canada.

Watch the full interview with Jeff Turner
Series director Jeff Turner
Logan Turner
Get it on the App Store! Order the DVD Download on iTunes
Also on CBC