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Journey from the secret world of Canada's wettest and most biologically diverse landscape, the temperate rainforest to the snow-capped peaks of the Rocky Mountains. The stories are intimate and epic: from wolves that fish for salmon to the thrilling sounds of head-butting male big horn sheep, to ice-covered grizzly bears living near the Arctic Circle. The ancient coastal forests hide rarely told stories of human and wildlife relationships that have co-existed for thousands of years.

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Grizzly bear
Fishing Branch River, Yukon
Kieran O'Donovan
On top of the Rockies in Alberta, the Wild Canada crew watched in awe as male bighorn sheep jousted for access to the females.
Bighorn sheep
Cadomin, Alberta
Ben Wallis
Bighorn sheep
Cadomin, Alberta
Ben Wallis
Bighorn sheep
Cadomin, Alberta
Ben Wallis
Bighorn sheep
Cadomin, Alberta
Ben Wallis
"On the way down the mountain they encountered a traffic jam - of a different kind." Bighorn sheep
Cadomin, Alberta
Ben Wallis
"The crew filmed over 500 hours of footage..." "...and visited 26+ Canadian Tires"
Harvesting clams
Quadra Island, British Columbia
Amanda McNaughton
Cineflex camera
Algonquin Park, Ontario
Keiran O'Donovan

To tell Canada's story – the Wild Canada team had to find a way to recreate the past - including the people and the wildlife that lived here so long ago.

The people that settled North America, during the last Ice Age, originally came from Siberia along an ice-free land bridge that was exposed when sea levels were much lower, connecting the continent with Russia.

First Peoples
Whistler, British Columbia
Amanda McNaughton

But the real human invasion didn't happen until much later.

At the end of the last Ice Age, 15 to 13,000 years ago, scientists believe that people walked south along the West coast - the main human migration route onto the continent. Just offshore was a very productive kelp forest marine ecosytem.

Those underwater forests provided a wealth of shellfish, fish, sea mammals and seabirds for early coastal migrants to eat.

Months were spent planning the recreation scenes so they were authentic as possible - right down to the clothing, hair and makeup.

The crew paid close attention to every last detail - right down to the bones the First Peoples might have discovered along the way.
Crew with mammoth skull
Squamish, British Columbia
Amanda McNaughton
On the Fishing Branch River, director and cameraman Jeff Turner and the crew shared some pretty close quarters with the wild inhabitants, who were there to catch salmon. Jeff Turner filming grizzly bear
Fishing Branch River, Yukon
Kieran O'Donovan

Learn more about Fishing Branch River – and how the team filmed the grizzly bears who visit here for the first time in HD.

Watch our behind the scenes story
Grizzly bear
Fishing Branch River, Yukon
Kieran O'Donovan
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