Kids to be permitted to touch art in National Gallery of Canada

According to Mr. Cartwright, he wants to use the 18th Century silver collection for 'Teddy Bear Picnics' this fall. (Chris Hondros/Getty Images)

According to Mr. Cartwright, he wants to use the 18th Century silver collection for 'Teddy Bear Picnics' this fall. (Chris Hondros/Getty Images)

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Best known for transforming many of the country's science centres into high grossing family attractions, consultant Lonny Cartwright has been hired by The National Gallery of Canada to make the gallery more appealing to children.
In his opinion the simplest way to get children interested in art is to let them touch it:

"Kids are tactile, they love the science centres because it's like a playground, we need to think of the National Gallery in this way."

Mr. Cartright went on to say, "we will make sure their hands don't have peanut butter on them, but other than that I want kids to have free reign in here."
 
Pat Kelly spoke with Lonny Cartright to learn more about his ideas on children and their relationship with The National Gallery of Canada.

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