Governor Mitt Romney - Budget 2012 - Occupy Next

Governor Mitt Romney

Since the Iowa caucuses in January, The Sunday Edition has had a standing request for an interview with former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney, who appears to be closing in on the Republican nomination for the 2012 U.S. presidential election. Michael Enright reached Governor Romney on the phone from his summer home in Wolfeboro, New Hampshire.

NOTE TO LISTENERS  - ADDED APRIL 5, 2012
Our interview with "Mitt Romney", as most of you guessed, was an April Fool's joke, with Governor Romney's part played by actor Ray Landry. We decided to go ahead with it in the spirit of a long tradition of news organizations running fake stories and interviews on April 1st.
 
http://voices.washingtonpost.com/rawfisher/2007/04/the_best_and_worst_april_fools.html
 
Michael will read some of the notes from the avalanche of mail we received about that interview on the program on April 8.
 
 

Documentary: Hartley's Violin

Thumbnail image for Titanic.jpgThe sinking of the Titanic a century ago was not just a moment in history; it became the stuff of legend. One of the legends is that as the ship sank, a small group of musicians played the hymn "Nearer, My God, to Thee". Wallace Hartley was the violinist and bandmaster of the Titanic. We'll hear his story in Hartley's Violin, a tale of courage and consolation. Produced by John Corcelli, with assistance from Dean Ples.

 

The T Word

CBC Radio's sketch comedy troup, The Irrelevant Show, brings us an irreverent take on one of the issues around this week's federal budget, which in many ways offered proof of how much Canada has changed.

Ideas that were mainstream only a decade ago, have fallen into such disrepute that no self-respecting politician would even consider proposing them in 2012. And there are words so toxic, they can destroy a career with a single utterance.

The Irrelevant Show team brings us a powerful portrait of a family torn apart by the filthiest word in Canadian politics. It's called The T-Word.

 

Music in Hour One:

March Past by the Oscar Peterson Trio, from Canadiana Suite
 
Goldberg Variations Movement 1 by Glenn Gould, from The Glenn Gould Edition, J.S. Bach, Goldberg Variations, BMV 988, Aria with 30 Variations
 
Dark Matter by Andrew Collins, from Cats and Dogs
 
Concerto Pour Deux Violons et Violoncelles, Op. 3, No. 1 by Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra, from Italian Concerti Grossi
 
Do It Again by Sophie Milman, from In the Moonlight
 
Introduction and Fandango by Trio de Guitares de Montreal, from Garam Masala

 

 

Hour Two

Thumbnail image for House of Commons door.jpgBudget 2012: How We Got Here

Finance Minister Jim Flaherty released his long-awaited budget this week, and while the pain was not as severe as many were predicting, the cuts were still significant...chopping 19,200 public-service jobs and $5.2 million in program spending. How did we get here? The Sunday Edition sits down with two renowned economists to find out. 

Scott Clark was deputy Finance Minister from 1997 to 2000, under then-Finance Minister Paul Martin. And Jack Mintz served on Mr. Flaherty's economic council, which was convened in December 2008 after the economic collapse.

Music in Hour Two:

Spider Season by Jesse Zubot and Steve Dawson, from Spider Season
 
The Best Things in Life are Free by Chase Sanborn and Guido Basso, from Cut To The Chase

 

Hour Three

Documentary:  Occupy Next

Occupy sign shrunk.JPGAt its height, Occupy was like a political earthquake,
rumbling, exploding, bursting out from its epicentre in Zuccotti Park to just about every corner of the world.

Last September 17th, hundreds of people flooded into Lower Manhattan to protest economic inequality and the corporate stranglehold on democracy. Within weeks, Occupy Wall Street had spread to hundreds of camps in cities in the U.S., Canada and across the globe, with its rallying cry, "We are the 99%!"

The New York police broke up the camp in their city after 60 days and camps in most other cities also disappeared. Occupy seemed to be fraying at the edges, but its power is still felt in astonishing ways. And in New York, six months after it all began, Occupy Wall Street is preparing for a high risk second act. Ira Basen's documentary is called Occupy Next.

Music in Hour Three:

Locks of Dread by Trio de Guitares de Montreal, from Garam Masala
 
Teach Your Children by Crosby, Stills and Nash, from Crosby, Stills and Nash
 
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