October 25, 2009: Abdullahi Ahmed An-Na'im, A True Heretic - The World According to John Irving - Andy Barrie stops by with his Uke!

Hour 1: Abdullahi Ahmed An-Na'im, A True Heretic - Michael spoke with Islamic Scholar and Charles Howard Candler Professor of Law, Emory University, and visiting professor at Georgetown University Law School, Abdullahi A An-Na'im about the argument within the Islamic world and what it means for the rest of us.

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Hour 2: The World According to John Irving - This fall, forty one years after his first novel was published, John Irving's 12th novel is in bookstores and bound for the bestseller lists. Last Night in Twisted River begins in 1954 in a logging camp in northern New Hampshire. It spans five decades, chronicling the complicated lives of Danny Angel, a young writer, his father, Dominic, a cook, and Ketchum, an irascible and illiterate logger.

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Hour 3: Ira Basen's News 2.0 - Part Two - The whole idea of news - how we deliver it and how we consume it - is being re-invented. This week we bring you Ira Basen with a reprise of the second installment of News 2.0: The future of news in an age of social media.

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Elsewhere on the show - Andy Barrie, the host of the CBC Toronto's Metro Morning, performed with his Ukulele for our producer Jean Dalrymple; Also in this hour, a personal essay called, My Life in a Fat Suit.


Michael Enright's Essay

As people line up for the H1N1 vaccine this week, many are still confused by the hysteria surrounding what to do and what to think about this recent pandemic. Michael gives us his insight into the matter with his essay for this week.

Abdullahi Ahmed An-Na'im - A True Heretic...

Since the attacks on September 11, 2001 on New York and Washington by the Islamic Militant Group Al Queda, there has been persistent argument about the relationship between Islam, both the religion and nations governed by Islamic law and what is often referred to as the West.

There are a number of hot button issues on both sides of the discussion which can cause mis-understandings and violence. But these are arguments that go on within Islam.

Michael spoke with Islamic Scholar and Charles Howard Candler Professor of Law, Emory University, and visiting professor at Georgetown University Law School, Abdullahi A An-Na'im about the argument within the Islamic world and what it means for the rest of us. Abdullahi A An-Na'im spoke with Michael from our Washington Studios.

A Special Performance from Andy Barrie

Andy Barrie, the host of the CBC Toronto's Metro Morning, performing on his Ukele for our producer Jean Dalrymple.

Listen to Hour One:

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The World According to John Irving

Four decades ago, Stanford University in California unveiled the world's first personal computer - which changed the way all of us work with words. Well, most of us anyway. This generalization does not include John Irving.

The author of blockbuster novels like The World According to Garp, A Prayer for Owen Meany, and The Cider House Rules, doesn't use a computer. He writes longhand, and types his manuscripts on one of a few cherished Selectric typewriters. It hasn't affected his productivity though.

This fall, forty one years after his first novel was published, John Irving's 12th novel is in bookstores and bound for the bestseller lists. Last Night in Twisted River begins in 1954 in a logging camp in northern New Hampshire. It spans five decades, chronicling the complicated lives of Danny Angel, a young writer, his father, Dominic, a cook, and Ketchum, an irascible and illiterate logger.

A Personal Essay

In the masquerade ball called life, we all wear disguises. Some more dramatic than others. Some appealing. Some not. We turn ourselves inside out, trying to present a picture to the world that we imagine serves our interests. Kyla Hanington put her costume on many years ago. It's given her plenty of trouble, and a few gifts. Her essay is called, My Life in a Fat Suit.

Listen to Hour Two:

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Ira Basen's News 2.0 - Part Two

It's been a long while now since tweet was a sound a bird made, and a new friend was someone with whom you'd recently spent some good times. Twitter, Facebook, Wikipedia, You Tube - the reigning monarchs of social media - have changed our language and the way we relate to each other. They're revolutionizing how we make revolutions, and they're revolutionizing the news business. It used to be that the tools of the journalistic trade were held by trained, paid professionals whose stories wouldn't air unless they were approved by editors, even lawyers. But an army of so-called citizen journalists is on the march. They can report whatever they want, and it's up to you to determine if it's true or not.

The whole idea of news - how we deliver it and how we consume it - is being re-invented. Here's Ira Basen with a reprise of the second installment of News 2.0: The future of news in an age of social media.

Listen to Hour Three:

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