How to prevent road traffic injury and death

More than a milliion people die each year in traffic accidents. Canadian Press/Eric Dreger

More than a milliion people die each year in traffic accidents. Canadian Press/Eric Dreger

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The World Health Organization has a top-ten list of diseases that kill. On that list, alongside scourges such as tuberculosis, heart disease and cancer, you will find "road traffic accidents".


The WHO reports that about one-and-a-quarter million people die every year doing what we all take for granted: driving on the road, crossing the road as a pedestrian, cycling or riding on a motorbike.
 
Road traffic injuries are the leading cause of death for young people between the ages of 15 and 29.

Ian Johnston has devoted his life to turning those numbers around. He is a world-renowned specialist in the area of road crash prevention and has headed dozens of road safety organizations and research groups in his native Australia, including the Victoria state government's road safety program.

Australia has been a leader in this area, as the first country on the planet to introduce compulsory seatbelt laws, helmet laws for cyclists and motorbikes, and a low blood-alcohol limit.

Johnston is the author of Eliminating Serious Injury and Death from Road Transport - A Crisis of Complacency.
 
 

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