Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

Boris Karloff's portrayal of the creature in the 1931 film influences how we think of Mary Shelley's 1818 story.

Boris Karloff's portrayal of the creature in the 1931 film influences how we think of Mary Shelley's 1818 story.

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Mary Shelley's Frankenstein: a special hour on the author of the most popular horror story of all time...

It has been said that Mary Shelley's life was like an opera... dramatic, melodramatic, licentious; stormy and tragic. On top of all that, she was only a teenager when she wrote the gothic novel, Frankenstein

Michael Enright talks to Helen Edmundson, the British playwright and author of Mary Shelley. And he will speak to Roseanne Montillo, author of The Lady and Her Monsters, A Tale of Dissections, Real-Life Frankensteins and the Creation of Mary Shelley's Masterpiece. Readings by Fiona Reid 
She was the daughter of Mary Wollstonecraft, the 18th century writer, and women's rights advocate, who died shortly after giving birth to her. At sixteen she eloped with the poet Percy Shelley, infuriating her father, William Godwin - the radical journalist and philosopher - who disowned her. She lost three of her four children, her husband drowned in a sailing accident and she died at 53 of a brain tumour. Hers was an illustration of Thomas Hobbes' assertion that life is "nasty brutish and short". And yet, despite all of that, Mary Shelley was a vigorous, courageous young woman who lived by her own rules and wrote one of the most enduring novels ever written. 

Here's a tour of the people, places and ideas important to Mary Shelley. 

Photo credit: Wikicommons (public domain images)
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