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Family feuds over wills and estates

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The stories are legion.   

Someone dies and an unholy war erupts in the family over who gets how much of the estate. It might be adult children doing battle with a step-parent. An absentee brother or sister may come out of hiding to claim a piece of the financial pie. Or the spoils of a will could become a spark that ignites adult sibling rivalry.

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Making the banks pay

Making the banks pay
In the aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis we all had one question in our minds: How many leading bankers are going to jail and for how long?

The answer of course was a) none and b) not applicable. The matter of why nobody went to jail has never been successfully addressed or answered.

Things went a bit differently in this program's favourite little corner of the world, Iceland. A year ago, the former CEO and Chair of one of the biggest failed banks in the country both went to jail.

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Family feuds over wills and estates

Family feuds over wills and estates
The stories are legion.   

Someone dies and an unholy war erupts in the family over who gets how much of the estate. It might be adult children doing battle with a step-parent. An absentee brother or sister may come out of hiding to claim a piece of the financial pie. Or the spoils of a will could become a spark that ignites adult sibling rivalry.

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Former soldier Rick Mitchell on the glorification of war on Remembrance Day

Former soldier Rick Mitchell on the glorification of war on Remembrance Day
There have been many requests for a letter from a listener, that Michael Enright read on the program on November 16th. The letter came in response to Michael's essay of November 9th, in which he explained why he doesn't usually wear a poppy on Remembrance Day.

Rick Mitchell, who lives on Gabriola Island, B.C. sent this:

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Karl Ove Knausgaard

Karl Ove Knausgaard
A few years ago, Karl Ove Knausgaard was a successful, award-winning novelist in his native Norway, the sort of writer who attains cachet and a measure of celebrity at home, but not the sort who becomes widely known beyond the borders of his small country; not the sort whose books are translated into languages around the world and become an international literary cause célèbre.

Then five years ago, Karl Ove Knausgaard published A Death in the Family, the first instalment of a six-volume, 3,600-page autobiographical novel provocatively entitled My Struggle. 

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Figures in Flight - A documentary about dance in prison

Figures in Flight - A documentary about dance in prison
Susan Slotnick is always moving. She is sixty-eight. A woman with presence. For decades, she has taught dance to children and teens in her hometown of New Paltz, New York, bringing good posture, proper foot position, a lot of discipline and the joy of movement into their lives.

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Making the banks pay - Michael's essay; Estates, wills and the entitled generation; Mail about war and Remembrance Day; Karl Ove Knausgaard; Mail about paid sick leave

Making the banks pay - Michael's essay; Estates, wills and the entitled generation; Mail about war and Remembrance Day; Karl Ove Knausgaard; Mail about paid sick leave
This week on The Sunday Edition, November 23, 2014:

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Ending child poverty, but when?

Ending child poverty, but when?
On November 24, 1989, Ed Broadbent, the leader of the NDP, rose in his place in the House of Commons to make what would be his final speech before retirement.

He put forward a resolution.  It read: "Be it resolved that this House express its concern for the more than one million Canadian children living in poverty and seek to achieve the goal of eliminating poverty among Canadian children by the year 2000."

It passed unanimously.

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John Cleese

John Cleese
Charlie Chaplin once said a day without laughter is a day wasted. By that measure, we can assure you there has been little waste in the life of John Cleese. He is probably best known as a co-founder of Monty Python's Flying Circus, which has been hailed as one of the best television programs of all time. It aired from 1969 to 1974.

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Temperature Rising: The fight over paid sick leave in the civil service

Temperature Rising: The fight over paid sick leave in the civil service
A few weeks ago, a Via Rail employee hobbled into work, obviously not feeling well. "Why don't you go home?" someone asked him.  "No sick leave", he said quietly. He would have to go three days without pay, then apply to the company insurance plan and hope that his claim was accepted.So he goes to work sick. As do a great many Canadians, despite our public health campaigns  - get your flu shot, stay home if you don't feel well.

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Listener mail about the theremin

The theremin is that mysterious electronic instrument whose Bolshevik and Cold War history is as fascinating as the music it makes. Toronto thereminist Clara Venice makes popular music with it. And it has a starring role in Sean Michaels' Giller-award winning novel, Us Conductors, which recounts the love story between Lev Theremin - the instrument's inventor - and its most famous player - Clara Rockmore.

Last week, we broadcast Out of Thin Air, a documentary about the theremin.

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