The Legacy of Bev Oda

International Cooperation Minister Bev Oda is resigning from Parliament effective July 31. (Sean Kilpatrick/CP)

International Cooperation Minister Bev Oda is resigning from Parliament effective July 31. (Sean Kilpatrick/CP)

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Bev Oda became one of those ministers. One that would score near the top of name recognition from the Harper cabinet if you went into a coffee shop anywhere in Canada. The problem for Ms. Oda, and for the Prime Minister, is that she became known for the wrong reasons. Her London hotel tastes, the price of her orange juice and a CIDA funding recommendation crudely altered with a hand-printed 'NOT'. All missteps that take away from her legacy at the helm of the agency that decides where Canada's foreign aid money goes. We talk about Bev Oda's legacy as one of the most significant ministers for our reputation around the world.


Part Two of The Current

Bev Oda's Legacy

Bev Oda may long be associated with pricey limos, posh hotels, the $16 glass of orange juice and NOT being clear on how one particular funding decision was reversed.

Those events distracted from major changes she oversaw to how Canada delivers foreign aid and where the aid goes, as Canada's Minister for International Cooperation.

It's clearly too early to know how the new minister of International Co-operation, Julian Fantino, will shape the job. Today we examine Bev Oda's legacy. And to do that we were joined by two people.

Samantha Nutt is the founder and executive director of War Child, which is an NGO that helps children overcome the effects of conflict and war. She's the author of Damned Nations: Greed, Guns, Armies and Aid.

And James Haga is the director of Advocacy with Engineers without Borders. They are both in our Toronto Studio.

This segment was produced by The Current's Gord Westmacott and Josh Bloch.

Last Word - Migratory Metamorphosis

In the days to come on The Current we'll look at the monarch butterfly mystery. It's not clear why so many of the insects have flown as far north as Edmonton. But it's far outside their traditional range. And they're not the only insect moving north. On today's Last word a preview of a migratory metamorphosis.

Other segments from today's show: