Radiator-Aid: Norwegian aid organization spoofs charities that stereotype Africa

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Many Africans are fed up with seeing their continent presented as a land of too little food, and too much war ,disease and corruption Yesterday, marked 28 years since the charity supergroup Band Aid, recorded Do They Know It's Christmas? But critics say there's a time and place for everything, and the time is overdue to do away with stereotypes of Africa, and present more realistic portraits. Today, we're talking radi-aid and re-branding Africa.



Radiator-Aid: Norwegian aid organization spoofs charities that stereotype Africa - Norwegian Students' and Academics' International Assistance Fund

The time of year is approaching when we consider people less fortunate than ourselves, and try to do something to help. In Africa, the coming of the solstice brings with it thoughts of the disadvantaged -- in Norway.




Above is a spoof music video encouraging Africans to donate radiators to help the freezing children of Norway. It's already got more than a million hits on Youtube. It is of course a parody of charity songs like Tears Are Not Enough and was produced by the Norwegian Students' and Academics' International Assistance Fund. It's an aid organization that aims to challenge fundraising that exploits African stereotypes.

With more about the campaign and video, we were joined by Erik Evans, president of the Norwegian Students' and Academics' International Assistance Fund, that produced Radi-Aid.

Radiator-Aid: Norwegian aid organization spoofs charities that stereotype Africa - Panel

In Canada, Maneo Mohale monitors African fundraising appeals and media portrayals of Africa. She's the local advocacy partnership director for the Africa Canada.org, based in Vancouver. And part of her work is to facilitate workshops called: So you want to save Africa. She joined us in our Vancouver studio.

And Robert Fox is the executive director of Oxfam Canada. He was in Ottawa. Hello.

Radiator-Aid: Norwegian aid organization spoofs charities that stereotype Africa

Comic Relief is a UK-based charity that's produced spoofs of its own. Here's a video that originally aired on the BBC, starring comedians Stephen Merchant and Ricky Gervais.



This segment was produced by The Current's Josh Bloch, Ellen Saenger and Ashley Walters.

Last Word - Clifford Tucker

We've been talking today about deporting criminals to foreign lands. Banishment, of course, is as old as borders. But the 19th century saw it taken to continental extremes. Australians joke their country was marked for glory, because its people were selected by the finest judges in England.

That's what's make the case of Clifford Tucker of so ironic. His family left Britain for Australia decades ago when he was just six. As a teenager, he shot and wounded a police officer and spent 12 years in prison.

Last year, Australia deported him --- to England. Leaving home and family is heartbreaking -- but there are worse punishments than life in London. The Australian media tried hard to sound sympathetic, perhaps a little too hard. Clifford Tucker gets today's Last Word.


Other segment from today's show:

Deporting permanent residents with criminal pasts

First Nations Financial Transparency Act: An insult or a necessity?

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