Gauging the fallout of Euro 2012

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As the soccer stars of the Euro 2012 prepare to tomorrow's start, some of the fans are kicking around a political football. Anti-semitism, sexism, homophobia and right-wing extremism are problems in both Poland and Ukraine, all of it highlighted in a BBC documentary Stadiums of Hate just released as Euro 2012 gets underway.


Part Three of The Current

Gauging the fallout of Euro 2012 - Poland Soccer Writer

We started this segment with a warning from a former British soccer star.

You could end up coming back in a coffin.

That's Sol Campbell... former captain of England's national soccer team. He warns fans to avoid attending Euro 2012 - UEFA's European soccer championship that gets underway in Poland and Ukraine tomorrow. Mr. Campbell is responding to a documentary called Stadiums of Hate.

BBC Reporter Chris Rogers spent a month filming in soccer stadiums in Poland and Ukraine. Yesterday he told Jian Ghomeshi on Q what he saw. We aired a clip.

The documentary led to international condemnation and calls from some to boycott the games. But not everyone agrees. Michal Zachodny writes a soccer blog, Goal.com. He was in Wroclaw, Poland.

Gauging the fallout of Euro 2012 - President, African Center in Ukraine

Our next guest has intimate knowledge of discrimination in Eastern Europe. Charles Asante-Yeboa is President of the African Center in Ukraine. He was in Kiev this morning.

Gauging the fallout of Euro 2012 - Social Pyschologist

Andreas Zick is a social psychologist and professor for Research on Socialization and Conflict at the University of Bielefeld in North-West Germany. He also advises the German football league on how to tackle racism. He was in Bielefeld, Germany.

This segment was produced by The Current's Kristin Nelson and Liz Hoath.

Last Word - Franklin Foer on Soccer

We've been looking at the intense emotions often ignited just by kicking a ball around a field. In his book, How Soccer Explains the World, Franklin Foer explains that states can harness these feelings in many ways -- and do. He says after the Iranian revolution, the new government took a while to figure out exactly what to do with soccer. On today's Last Word, Foer shares his thoughts on how soccer changed Tehran.


Other segments from today's show:

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