The Future of the Bloc

The Bloc Quebecois has been reduced to four seats in the House of Commons. We're asking what this means for the future of the sovereignty movement and Quebec's relationship with the rest of Canada.



PART ONE

Satire

It's Wednesday, May 4th.

39-year-old Justin Trudeau and 43-year-old Dominic Leblanc are among those rumoured to be in contention for the Liberal leadership, now that Michael Ignatieff has resigned.

Currently, insiders say the party is only considering candidates who are young. Because by time the Liberals regain power, they won't be.

This is The Current.

The Future of the Bloc

On election night, NDP chants were perhaps loudest in Quebec where the so-called "Orange Crush" all but obliterated the reigning Bloc Quebecois. The Bloc went into the election with 49 seats but will send just four MPs back to Ottawa for the next session of Parliament.

With so few seats left, the Bloc has lost official party status in the House. It was a crushing defeat, and no one felt it more than party leader Gilles Duceppe, who lost his own seat in the onslaught.

Mr. Duceppe insists the party will survive. And though some have been quick to see this as a serious -- or even fatal -- blow to the sovereignty movement, Quebec Premier Jean Charest and Parti Quebecois Leader Pauline Marois don't share that sentiment. We aired a clip.

Still such a rout of the Bloc Quebecois will affect the party's future, the direction of sovereignty movement and Quebec's relationship with the rest of Canada. Vivian Barbot is the party's vice-president. She lost her own seat to the Liberal Party's Justin Trudeau in Montreal's Papineau riding in 2008, and made an unsuccessful bid to win that seat back in Monday's election. Vivian Barbot was in Montreal this morning. Maxime Bellerose was one of the Bloc organizers who urged Quebecers to vote NDP. He used to be a riding association president for the Bloc. And he was in Montreal this morning. And Bernard St. Laurent has been watching this unfold with interest. He's well known to CBC radio listeners. He hosts Radio Noon in Montreal and C'est La Vie. He was also in Montreal.

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