August 6, 2010


Pt 1: Pickton Mistakes- Thanks to the lifting of a publication ban, there is new and troubling information about the investigation of convicted serial killer Robert Pickton. Among other things, it suggests that if police and prosecutors had handled an earlier investigation differently, some of the women Pickton went on to kill might still be alive. Jim Brown will talk to Dave Dickson, a retired Vancouver police officer who says police made crucial mistakes and that an inquiry is needed. (Read More)

Download Flash Player to view this content.

 

Pt 2: A Feature Interview with Wilbert Rideau - Wilbert Rideau went to Angola prison as a murderer sentenced to die in the electric chair, and became an award winning journalist behind bars. He tells his incredible story in a new autobiography called, In The Place of Justice: A Story of Punishment and Deliverance. (Read More)

Download Flash Player to view this content.

Having trouble with our audio or video players? Check out the Help Page



Whole Show Blow-by-Blow

Today's guest host was Jim Brown.

It's Friday August 6th

The British army has hired the star of the Canadian reality show Mantracker to help train its soldiers to spot roadside bombs when they go to Afghanistan.

Currently, Not to be outdone, the Afghan Army is using America's Most Wanted to find fresh recruits.

This is the Current.

Pickton Mistakes

Doug LePard, Vancouver's Deputy Police Chief, issued a public apology for the mistakes that police made during the investigation of convicted serial killer Robert Pickton. That was last week. But this week has brought even more troubling revelations.

Thanks to the lifting of a publication ban, we now know that Robert Pickton was charged with the attempted murder of a sex trade worker in 1997, five years before he was arrested and charged as a serial killer. But that case was never brought to trial. And in the years that followed, Pickton murdered at least six women. He was charged with the murders of 20 others. But those charges have now been stayed. The news has sparked renewed criticism of how police and prosecutors handled the Pickton case as well as calls for an inquiry into how they did.

Stevie Cameron has been following the Pickton case since the very beginning. And she's the author of two books about it: The Pickton Files and the forthcoming, On The Farm. Stevie Cameron was in Montreal.

British Columbia's Premier Gordon Campbell hasn't decided yet whether he'll call an inquiry, but Dave Dickson doesn't have any doubts about the need for an inquiry. He was an officer with the Vancouver Police in the 1990s, when women first started disappearing from the city's Downtown East Side. He was in Vancouver.

The revelations about how the Pickton case was handled have been especially disconcerting for sex-trade workers in Vancouver. Susan Davis is a sex-trade worker in Vancouver, as well as the development coordinator of Canada's first sex worker cooperative.

HOUR TWO

Wilbert Rideau

When Wilbert Rideau entered Louisiana State Prison -- better known as "Angola" -- he was a convicted murderer sentenced to die in the electric chair. When he walked out 44 years later, he was an award-winning, crusading journalist being cited as the most reformed prisoner in the United States. He tells his incredible story in a new autobiography. It's called, In The Place of Justice: A Story of Punishment and Deliverance. Wilbert Rideau was in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

Comments are closed.