March 2, 2010

Pt 1: Defining Moments - We started this segment with a clip of Sidney Crosby speaking to CTV just moments after his gold-medal-winning over-time goal on Sunday. He has had plenty of chances to catch a replay of his shot since then. Oh, and he was right. It did go through the five-hole.
 
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Pt 2: Two Brushes, Four Eyes - When Mary Kennedy and Michelle Woodey set up their company Fiona Hoop, they began a working relationship that may be unparalleled in Canadian art. They're both painters, and successful ones at that. And every canvas that comes out of their Toronto studio has brush marks from each of them. For them, it's more than a common vision. It's like they share a creative brain.

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Pt 3: Child of Dust - Ali Eteraz grew up in a family steeped in Islam. He spent his formative years in a part of Pakistan where fundamentalism thrives and Taliban ideology is strong. And then, when he was ten, his family moved to the United States. They eventually settled in the Bible Belt region of Alabama.

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It's Tuesday, March 2nd.

Honouring his bet on the men's hockey game, President Barack Obama will buy Stephen Harper a case of Molson Canadian.

Currently ... Wait, I thought Harper WON the bet.

This is the Current

Defining Moments

We started this segment with a clip of Sidney Crosby speaking to CTV just moments after his gold-medal-winning over-time goal on Sunday. He has had plenty of chances to catch a replay of his shot since then. Oh, and he was right. It did go through the five-hole.

About 15 million Canadians spent the 7 minutes and 40 seconds before that goal bound together in mutual anxiety. Then, with one flick of Sidney Crosbie's wrists, they came cheering to their feet. Nearly half of the country watched the entire game. More than 80 per cent of us tuned in to at least part of it. It's the kind of shared experience that doesn't happen very often. And many people have been quick to paint it as a defining national moment. Now that's a tall order for any one game, no matter how thrilling it might have been. So we decided to pause, take a breath and ask three people to help us figure out what defines a defining national moment.

Ron MacLean is the Host of Hockey Night in Canada on CBC Television. He was in Toronto. Margaret MacMillan is a historian and the Warden at St. Anthony's College at Oxford University. She was in Oxford, England. And John Ralston Saul is a philosopher and the author of A Fair Country: Telling Truths about Canada. He's also the President of International PEN and he was in Toronto.

And we ended this part with some thoughts from across the country about how to define a defining moment.


Two Brushes, Four Eyes

When Mary Kennedy and Michelle Woodey set up their company Fiona Hoop, they began a working relationship that may be unparalleled in Canadian art. They're both painters, and successful ones at that. And every canvas that comes out of their Toronto studio has brush marks from each of them. For them, it's more than a common vision. It's like they share a creative brain. T

This morning, as part of our on-going series Work In Progress, we aired Sandra Bourque's documentary about a remarkable partnership. It's called Two Brushes, Four Eyes.

If you're interested in seeing the paintings by Mary Kennedy and Michelle Woodey you can google their company. It's called Fiona Hoop.


Child of Dust

Ali Eteraz grew up in a family steeped in Islam. He spent his formative years in a part of Pakistan where fundamentalism thrives and Taliban ideology is strong. And then, when he was ten, his family moved to the United States. They eventually settled in the Bible Belt region of Alabama.

Along the way, Ali Eteraz's faith was challenged repeatedly and in a wide variety of ways. And his journey has given him a rare perspective on Pakistan and the West. Ali Eteraz writes about that journey in his new book, Children of Dust: A Memoir of Pakistan. He was in our Toronto studio.

Last Word - Henderson Goal

We ended the program with one more thought about defining national moments ... something we touched on earlier in the program. Sidney Crosby's overtime goal isn't the first memorable hockey moment to be celebrated as a patriotic touchstone. So we wanted to revisit Foster Hewitt's famous play-by-play of Paul Henderson's series-winning goal against the Soviets in 1972.

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