February 8, 2010

 

Pt 1: Maternal Health - We started this segment with a clip of Prime Minister Stephen Harper speaking two weeks ago at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, where he outlined a desire to improve maternal health in the developing world.

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Pt 2: Squamish Talk Tape - When a city is preparing to make a pitch to host the Olympics, it puts together what's called a "bid book." It's full of probable, possible and even fanciful promises. It's a vision statement untempered by costs, or by deadlines.

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Pt 3: Haiti Solutions - For Paul Romer, the world's most intractable problems are going to need the world's most innovative solutions. He's a Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy. And William Easterly -- an economist at New York University -- describes him with this quote: "There's a thin line between revolutionary and crazy. Paul Romer has been adept at walking that line, staying just out of the crazy part. He's still tip-toeing along that line with this new idea."

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It's Monday, February 8th.

A picture of an onion ring has successfully earned more Facebook fans than Prime Minister Stephen Harper.

Currently ... Which is why it's getting a Senate seat.

This is The Current.

Maternal Health - Canada

We started this segment with a clip of Prime Minister Stephen Harper speaking two weeks ago at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, where he outlined a desire to improve maternal health in the developing world.

The numbers from the developing world are shocking. But the numbers from Canada's own aboriginal communities are also disturbing. A study published last month in the Canadian Medical Association Journal says Inuit infants are three-and-a-half-times more likely to die than babies born in the south. The same study found the risk of still-birth in the north is nearly twice as high as the national average. And sub-standard maternal health outcomes are common in native communities in the south. So there are those who say that if Prime Minister Harper wants to champion maternal health, he should start at home.

For their thoughts on how he might do that, we were joined by Doctor Isaac Sobol. He is Nunavut's Chief Medical Officer of Health and he was in Iqaluit. And Cheryllee Bourgeois is a midwife who works extensively with native communities. She's with Seventh Generation Midwives in Toronto.

Maternal Health - Martin

We requested an interview with Leona Aglukkaq, the Federal Health Minister and the MP for Nunavut. We didn't hear back from her office. The Prime Minister's office did not respond to our request either.

Former Prime Minister Paul Martin has thought a lot about this issue. Since leaving politics he has founded The Martin Aboriginal Education Initiative and the Capital for Aboriginal Prosperity and Entrepreneurship Fund.


Listen to Part One:



Squamish Talk Tape

When a city is preparing to make a pitch to host the Olympics, it puts together what's called a "bid book." It's full of probable, possible and even fanciful promises. It's a vision statement untempered by costs, or by deadlines.

Once the city gets the games, things such as costs and deadlines suddenly snap into a sharp focus. And some of the more extravagant or impractical promises are re-worked or abandoned altogether. But there's a brief moment before reality sets in -- when all things seem possible and everyone who wants a piece of the Olympic pie is still in line with plate in hand.

Dominic Girard is a producer with The Current.

War Zone E.R. - Promo

Tomorrow on The Current, we continue our series Work In Progress with a documentary about a man doing what has to be one of the toughest jobs. Until last fall, when the Americans took over, Major Marc Dauphin was in charge of coordinating all the activity at the Role 3 Multinational Military Hospital at the Kandahar Air Base in Afghanistan. Jinder Oujla-Chalmers is a Vancouver-based film-maker. And she'll bring us a documentary called War Zone E.R. We aired a preview.

You can hear the full documentary, tomorrow on The Current.


Listen to Part Two:



 

Haiti Solutions - Charter Cities

For Paul Romer, the world's most intractable problems are going to need the world's most innovative solutions. He's a Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy. And William Easterly -- an economist at New York University -- describes him with this quote: "There's a thin line between revolutionary and crazy. Paul Romer has been adept at walking that line, staying just out of the crazy part. He's still tip-toeing along that line with this new idea."

That new idea goes something like this. Good societies are built on good rules. And now here's the "revolutionary / crazy" part. Instead of focusing on getting poor countries to change their rules, Paul Romer wants to focus on moving people someplace better ... someplace he calls a Charter City. And he believes his theory could have implications for people around the Globe. Paul Romer joined us from Stanford, California to explain.

Music Bridge

Artist: Thievery Corporation
Cd: Radio Retaliation
Cut: #1, Sound the Alarm
Label: ESL
Spine: ESL 140

Last Word - Squamish

We ended the program today with one more word from Squamish, British Columbia. Earlier, we heard how the town had hoped to be a greater part of the Olympic Games and about the hard work people such as Denise Imbeau are putting into that effort.

Well, here's one more story from her that illustrates how hard she's willing to work. She traveled to the 2006 Winter Olympics in Torino, Italy. And along with her came a sizable amount of Squamish promotional material. We let Denise Imbeau explain what happened next.


Listen to Part Three:

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