January 1, 2010

Pt 1: Immortality Enzyme - Last fall, the Nobel Prize in Medicine went to three scientists for their discovery of what is being called the Immortality Enzyme.

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Pt 2: Angela Davis Interview - In the 1960s and 70s, Angela Davis was one of the most famous -- and notorious -- women in the United States. She was active in the civil rights movement, a member of the Black Panthers. And the image of her, fist raised in the black power salute, is an icon of the time.

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Pt 3: Malcolm Gladwell Interview - The next time you reach for a bottle of Heinz ketchup, ask yourself why it tastes so good. Then ask yourself why so many people always buy that brand.

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NOTE:

The first half-hour of The Current was preempted by special CBC programming and we have packaged three memorable interviews from 2009. Enjoy and Happy New Year from The Current Staff!


It's Friday, January 1st.
 
Tiger Woods has been named the top athlete of the last decade.
 
Currently, he was praised highly for his golf game too.
 
This is The Current.


Immortality Enzyme


Last fall, the Nobel Prize in Medicine went to three scientists for their discovery of what is being called the Immortality Enzyme.

The enzyme helps cells multiply without the effects of aging. And for Ray Kurzweil, that's more ammunition for his argument that some of us could live forever. Now before you dismiss him, there are a few things you should know. Ray Kurzweil is a scientist with a respected track record. He created the first text-to-speech synthesizer software. M.I.T. has recogized him as one of the most important innovators of our time. And Forbes Magazine calls him the rightful heir to Thomas Edison.

Anna Maria Tremonti spoke to him last October about his latest book, Transcend: Nine Steps to Living Well Forever. And he does mean forever.


Angela Davis Interview

In the 1960s and 70s, Angela Davis was one of the most famous -- and notorious -- women in the United States. She was active in the civil rights movement, a member of the Black Panthers. And the image of her, fist raised in the black power salute, is an icon of the time.

Today, Angela Davis is a professor, an activist and the author of eight books, including Are Prisons Obsolete? and the soon-to-be published, The Meaning of Freedom. She's also the founder of Critical Resistance, a group that advocates for the abolition of the U.S. prison system.

Anna Maria tremonti had a chance to talk with her in a rare interview in October, when she was in Montreal for the McGill Beaverbrook Lecture on "Media, Race and Power".

Music

Cut: Sweet Black Angel
Album: Exile on Main St.
Artist: The Rolling Stones
Label: Virgin


Malcolm Gladwell Interview

The next time you reach for a bottle of Heinz ketchup, ask yourself why it tastes so good. Then ask yourself why so many people always buy that brand.

Malcolm Gladwell gives us his answer to that question in a wonderful essay called The Ketchup Conundrum. It's one of twenty essays in his latest book, What the Dog Saw and Other Adventures.They cover a wide variety of topics ... from the history of hair colour to why some people fail. And the thread that runs through them all is the idea that what might seem mundane or trivial, can have deeper and significant roots.

Anna Maria tremonti spoke to Malcolm Gladwell in November.

Last Word - Music

Cut: Curious
Album: Snacktime
Artist:Barenaked Ladies
Label: Desperation

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