November 30, 2009

Pt 1: Women & Climate Change - In the past, there haven't been many women at the table for those high-level negotiations. And according to Joanna Kerr, that's a problem because she says around the world, it's women who suffer the most from the effects of climate change. Joanna Kerr is the Director of Policy and Outreach with Oxfam Canada. She was in Amsterdam.

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Pt 2: Bullying in the Workplace: Part One - In the past, there haven't been many women at the table for those high-level negotiations. And according to Joanna Kerr, that's a problem because she says around the world, it's women who suffer the most from the effects of climate change. Joanna Kerr is the Director of Policy and Outreach with Oxfam Canada. She was in Amsterdam.

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Pt 3: Bullying in the Workplace: Part Two - We continued our discussion on bullying in the workplace with our producer, Howard Goldenthal.

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It's Monday, November 30th.

The Federal Government wants to make it harder for Canadians convicted of crimes in other countries to be transferred back to Canada.

Currently, Letting the Afghan authorities handle things should do the trick.

This is The Current.

Women & Climate Change

We started this segment with a clip of Connie Hedegaard, Denmark's Minister for Climate and Energy. She's the incoming President of the United Nations' Climate Change Conference. She'll be playing a major role at the talks that begin in Copenhagen next week.

In the past, there haven't been many women at the table for those high-level negotiations. And according to Joanna Kerr, that's a problem because she says around the world, it's women who suffer the most from the effects of climate change. Joanna Kerr is the Director of Policy and Outreach with Oxfam Canada. She was in Amsterdam.

Women & Climate Change - Panel

At the last UN Climate Change Conference in Poznan, Poland, a year ago, 15 per cent of the parties' delegations were headed by women. Critics say it's not surprising that gender equity isn't mentioned in climate change agreements or final documents.

But this year, a group of activists have won the recognition of "women and gender" as an official constituency. And they're lobbying to have the word "gender" included in whatever agreement emerges from Copenhagen.

For their thoughts on this, we were joined by three people. Rebecca Pearl is the Coordinator of the Global Gender and Climate Alliance and she was in New York City. Elizabeth May is the leader of the Green Party of Canada and she was in Ottawa. And Cheryl Maloney is the Director of Environment for the Native Women's Association of Canada. She was in Halifax.

And here at The Current, we believe that people who live in glass houses should not throw stones. So when our producers were putting together this segment, they checked our own record on women and climate change. And what did they find? Out of all the guests we've interviewed about climate change this season ... only a third were women.

 

Bullying in the Workplace (Part One)

The Ontario Government is considering a bill that would out-law bullying in the workplace. As part of our on-going series Work In Progress, our producer, Howard Goldenthal delves into the forms that workplace bullying can take, assess the damage it can do and the strategies for dealing with it.

 

Bullying in the Workplace (Part Two)

We continued our discussion on bullying in the workplace with our producer, Howard Goldenthal.

Some links of interest: Workplace Bullying Institute, and the University of New Brunswick has created a website on workplace bullying.

Inside the Kingdom

It is a conflict few are talking about, on the edge of a kingdom few understand. Saudi Arabia continues to battle Yemeni rebels along its border -- alleging they have connections to both the Iranian government and Al Qaeda. It is the latest turn in the delicate politics of a country that now feels threatened by the same forces many accuse it of unleashing on the world.

Thirty years ago Robert Lacey published a comprehensive study of the Saudi kingdom, only to have his work banned in that country. A lot has changed since then ... so Robert Lacey decided to go back. He spent three years living in Jeddah with exceptional access to the circle of people around King Abdullah bin Abdul Aziz. He shares those experiences in his new book Inside The Kingdom: Kings, Clerics, Modernists, Terrorists and the Struggle for Saudi Arabia.

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