October 6, 2009

Pt 1: Honduras - President Manuel Zelaya was in his pajamas when the soldiers came. And before he could get dressed, they had taken him at gunpoint and forced him out of Honduras and into exile.

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Pt 2: Shane Earle - We started this segment with a clip of Shane Earle describing his reaction to last week's arrest of Bishop Raymond Lahey and the news that Bishop Lahey has been charged with possessing and importing child pornography.

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Pt 3: Prison Farms - If you think of a prison, you probably don't think of inmates feeding chickens or milking cows. But for about three hundred inmates across the country, that's been an essential part of their days. Those inmates work at six federal prison farms in operation in New Brunswick, Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan and British Columbia. The farms are part of a work program aimed at giving prisoners the skills they'll need to find jobs and reintegrate into society once out of prison.

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It's Tuesday, October 6th.

A 27-year-old man who jumped into a tiger enclosure at the Calgary Zoo suffered "significant injuries" when a Siberian tiger attacked him.

Currently, hospital officials didn't comment on the man's condition, but the tiger said he tasted grrrreat!

This is the Current.


Honduras: Manuel Zelaya

President Manuel Zelaya was in his pajamas when the soldiers came. And before he could get dressed, they had taken him at gunpoint and forced him out of Honduras and into exile.

Three months later, on September 21st, Manuel Zelaya snuck back into Honduras and made a beeline for the Brazilian Embassy, where he has been ever since. The embassy compound is surrounded by soldiers and police who answer to the man who replaced him ... the country's de facto leader, Roberto Micheletti. Now a high-level group of Latin American leaders is trying to find a solution to the standoff.

One solution could be the San Jose Agreement also known as the 'Arias Plan', which could reinstate President Zelaya. So far the Arias Plan remains unsigned. After several attempts, we managed to get through to Manuel Zelaya.

Manuel Zelaya is the elected President of Honduras. We spoke with him from the Brazilian Embassy in Tegucigalpa, where he has taken refuge. The Current's Pedro Sanchez provided the translation.

Honduras - Jorge Heine

The Current requested an interview with Peter Kent, the Minister of State for Foreign Affairs responsible for the Americas. We were told he is not available today.

For his thoughts on how Canada and other countries throughout the Americas are dealing with the crisis in Honduras, we were joined by Jorge Heine. He is a Distinguished Fellow at the Centre for International Governance Innovation and a professor of political science at Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo, Ontario.



 

Shane Earle

We started this segment with a clip of Shane Earle describing his reaction to last week's arrest of Bishop Raymond Lahey and the news that Bishop Lahey has been charged with possessing and importing child pornography.

You may remember Shane Earle. He was among the boys who were sexually abused by some of the Christian Brothers who ran the Mount Cashel Orphanage in Newfoundland in the 1980s. His testimony was a crucial part of the inquiry into the abuse there.

While he was in Mount Cashel, he met up with Raymond Lahey, who at the time was a priest in Mount Pearl, Newfoundland. And on a visit to Father Lahey's home, Shane Earle says he found images of child pornography. The CBC's Mary Lynk sat down with Shane Earle yesterday to find out more about what he saw and what he said about it. Mary Lynk is the network producer for CBC Radio based in Halifax.

Music Bridge

Artist: Ray Montford
Cd: Fragile Balance
Cut: 6, Remember
Label: Softtail



 

Prison Farms

If you think of a prison, you probably don't think of inmates feeding chickens or milking cows. But for about three hundred inmates across the country, that's been an essential part of their days. Those inmates work at six federal prison farms in operation in New Brunswick, Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan and British Columbia. The farms are part of a work program aimed at giving prisoners the skills they'll need to find jobs and reintegrate into society once out of prison.

But the federal government plans to close prison farms by 2011, citing the four-million-dollar-a-year price tag and the fact that few ex-cons end up in agriculture. But corrections workers, farmers and prisoners' advocates say that's hogwash. And they don't plan to let the farms close without a fight.

Rick Sauve is a former inmate who now works with LifeLine, a group that works with prisoners who are serving life sentences. He was in Kawartha Lakes, Ontario. Betty Brown is a cattle farmer in Summerfield, New Brunswick. She's also a member of the National Farmers Union. And Wayne Easter is the Liberal Party's agriculture critic and a former Solicitor-General of Canada. He was in Ottawa.

Prison Farm - Government Supporter

Two years ago, Correctional Services Canada's independent review panel released a report called, A Road Map to Strengthening Public Safety. Among many other things, the report recommended investing in ways to prepare prisoners for the workforce. Rob Sampson was the chair of the review panel. He was also Ontario's Minister of Correctional Services under Premier Mike Harris. And he was in Toronto.

Last Word - Folsom Prison

And if he were alive today one wonders where Johnny Cash would stand on the whole question of prison farms. Johnny Cash always expressed a deep empathy for prisoners in his songs. And in the late 1960s, he performed several concerts for inmates at prisons across the United States. We ended the program today with Johnny Cash singing Folsom Prison Blues from the live album At Folsom Prison.

Music

Artist: Johnny Cash
Cd: At Folsom Prison
Cut: 1, Folsom Prison Blues
Label: Columbia/Legacy
Spine: CK 65955



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