August 03, 2009

Pt 1: Cheapness - For some people, nothing tops a great bargain. Finding an item on sale, paying a reduced price -- the profound desire of getting something for cheap. And at this time of year, many of us are scowering the summer sell-out bargain bins, looking for a deal.

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Pt 2: Left Behind - Documentary - Last June, Stephen Harper apologized - on behalf of the government of Canada - not only for the known excesses of the residential school system, but for the creation of the system itself.

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Today's summer guest host was Tom Harrington.

It's Monday, August 3rd.

Calgary's city council has approved a plan to outfit all police officers who patrol the downtown with cowboy hats.

Currently, the hope is to reduce incidents where police are taken seriously.

This is The Current.


Cheapness

For some people, nothing tops a great bargain. Finding an item on sale, paying a reduced price -- the profound desire of getting something for cheap. And at this time of year, many of us are scowering the summer sell-out bargain bins, looking for a deal.

But it might not be that simple, according to my next guest that fixation on finding that next great deal means paying a much bigger price when we step back to take in the bigger picture.

Ellen Ruppel Shell is a contributing editor for the Atlantic magazine, a Professor of Journalism at Boston University and is the author of a new book called Cheap: the High Cost of Discount Culture. She was in Boston.


 

 

Left Behind - Documentary

Last June, Stephen Harper apologized - on behalf of the government of Canada - not only for the known excesses of the residential school system, but for the creation of the system itself.

But that apology meant little to many of Labrador's Inuit who attended schools that were not funded directly by the government and are not officially recognized as "residential schools." Hundreds of Aboriginal people in Newfoundland and Labrador are now involved in a class action lawsuit against the institutions that ran those schools.

Nora Ford and Shirley Flowers are two Inuit women from Labrador who attended the boarding schools and who are now lobbying the government to recognize their schools as residential schools. CBC reporter Kate Kyle prepared a documentary about their story. It's called Left Behind, and it first aired on The Current in January.

Update: Approximately 1,800 former students have now signed on to the class action suit.



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