December 22, 2008

Pt 1: Rwanda Survivors - It's been 14 years since the Rwandan genocide. And lawyers all over the world are still trying to sort out who will be held responsible.

Read more here

Pt 2: Newfoundland Premier - It has all the makings of an epic fight: a tract of land three times the size of Prince Edward Island, a multi-national corporate giant with what it calls prominent legal counsel and a populist politician who is unapologetic, and unafraid of a fight.

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Pt 3: Six o'clock in Alabama - Last summer, the United Nations leveled a stunning allegation against the state of Alabama. According to the UN, state officials there are "strikingly indifferent" to the risk of executing innocent convicts and may have already sent innocent people to their deaths. Thomas Arthur is a 66-year-old convict who's on death row for a crime he insists he didn't commit. The Current's Howard Goldenthal travelled to Atmore, Alabama to spend the days before his execution with Thomas Arthur's daughter. The execution was scheduled -- as they always are -- for Six O'Clock in Alabama.

Read more here

It's Monday December 22nd.

According to a new list released by the Insurance Bureau of Canada, the top cars that are LEAST likely to be stolen include Cadillacs, Lincolns and Chevys.

Currently, I guess the US auto executives were right. They can't even give their vehicles away.

This is the Current.


Rwanda Survivors

It's been 14 years since the Rwandan genocide. And lawyers all over the world are still trying to sort out who will be held responsible.

Last week, Quebec Superior Court Justice Andre Denis heard the final arguments in the trial of Désiré Munyaneza. Mr. Munyaneza came to Canada from Rwanda ten years ago. He's alleged to have been a militia leader during the genocide. And he's charged with two counts of genocide, two counts of crimes against humanity and three counts of war crimes. He's also the first person to be charged under Canada's Crimes Against Humanity and War Crimes Act.

The same day those arguments were delivered, The International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda sentenced Theoneste Bagosora to life in prison. He's the former Rwandan Army Colonel who was in charge of the soldiers and Hutu militia members who murdered 800,000 people -- mainly minority Tutsis and moderate Hutus. He was found guilty of genocide and crimes against humanity.

Alice Musabende and Dada Gasirabo are both survivors of the Rwandan genocide and they've been watching the long -- and often slow -- process of bringing the people responsible for what happened to justice. They both came to Canada after the genocide. Alice Musabende was in Ottawa. And Dada Gasirabo was in Toronto for the show.


Listen to Part One:

 

Newfoundland Premier

It has all the makings of an epic fight: a tract of land three times the size of Prince Edward Island, a multi-national corporate giant with what it calls prominent legal counsel and a populist politician who is unapologetic, and unafraid of a fight.

It was just a week ago that the government of Premier Danny Williams, with the support of opposition MHAs, passed legislation expropriating all of Abitibi Bowater's water and timber rights and hydro assets in Newfoundland and Labrador. That adds up to more than four million acres of land. It was swift action in response to Abitibi Bowater's plan to close its pulp and paper mill in Grand Falls-Windsor, a move affecting 600 jobs. On Friday of last week, the company fired its own salvo in a five page letter, calling the province' s grab unscrupulous, unfounded and illegal, and making it clear it will pursue every route possible to get those rights back.

The letter was addressed to Premier Danny Williams but released to anyone who wanted to read it. Premier Williams joined us for this show from St. John's.

And last week, Anna Maria spoke with an international trade lawyer named Lawrence Herman last Thursday. He works with Cassels Brock and Blackwell in Toronto, and we played a clip of what he had to say about the dispute and the legal implications.


Promo

Over the next two weeks, we're going to be re-broadcasting some of our documentaries from the last year.

Coming up on Wednesday December 24th, we'll hear "The Miracles of Rose Prince."

It's a documentary about a woman that many believe is a saint, though The Vatican has never recognized her - a dead woman whose body has never decayed. Her followers pray on holy ground that was once home to an Indian residential school in British Columbia and they look for miracles. At the end of our audio for part two, you'll hear a little preview.

 

Listen to Part Two:


Six o'clock in Alabama


Last summer, the United Nations leveled a stunning allegation against the state of Alabama. According to the UN, state officials there are "strikingly indifferent" to the risk of executing innocent convicts and may have already sent innocent people to their deaths. Thomas Arthur is a 66-year-old convict who's on death row for a crime he insists he didn't commit. The Current's Howard Goldenthal travelled to Atmore, Alabama to spend the days before his execution with Thomas Arthur's daughter. The execution was scheduled -- as they always are -- for Six O'Clock in Alabama.

And we should warn you ... This documentary contains some violent subject matter and may not be suitable for younger listeners. "Six O'Clock in Alabama" first aired on the Current in September.

Music Bridge

Song for Digging
Artist: Joe Lapinski
CD: Sundries
Cut: CD9, "Song for Digging"
Label: Yummy Recordings
Spine #: yum009


Last Word: Jean-Paul Samputu - Music

Earlier in the program we heard from some survivors of the Rwandan genocide who are now living in Canada. They spoke to us about their efforts to heal despite the slow pace of justice in prosecuting the people responsible for the genocide. Jean-Paul Samputu is a Rwandan singer-songwriter who is using music to help heal the wounds of the Rwandan people as well as his own. He lost his parents and three siblings in the genocide. He now lives in Canada as well. And we'll leave you with his song "Karame Mwana" which means "Cherish the Children." It's from his album Testimony of Rwanda.

Listen to Part Three:

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