December 8, 2008

Pt 1: 100th Canadian Soldier - We started the program this morning with the names of the first 50 Canadians who lost their lives serving in Afghanistan.

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Pt 2: Zimbabwe - If you turn on a tap in Zimbabwe's capital city, there's a good chance you won't get any water. And if you do, there's good chance it will make you very, very sick. Harare's water system has all but collapsed. And its water supply is now contaminated with cholera. Across the country, at least 565 people have died from cholera since August. More than 12,000 are now infected. And that number is growing.

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Pt 3: Stolen Art - On September 4, 1972, a group of thieves staged a brazen heist at Montreal's Museum of Fine Art. They broke into the museum through a skylight and proceeded to take seventeen paintings, including Rembrandt's "Landscape with Cottages." That was 36 years ago. And those paintings haven't been seen since.

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There was no satire today.


100th Canadian Soldier

We started the program this morning with the names of the first 50 Canadians who lost their lives serving in Afghanistan.

The number of Canadians killed serving in Afghanistan reached 100 Friday. You just heard the names of the first 50 Canadians to die in a conflict that began in 2002. Corporal Paul Davis was the ninth Canadian soldier to die in Afghanistan.
He was 19 when he joined the military. He spent eight years in the infantry, with tours in Bosnia and Afghanistan. He was married with two young daughters, aged three and five.

In early 2006, Corporal Davis was stationed in Kandahar when he received a much anticipated transfer. He was going to be an airforce mechanic back home. A job that would allow him to go home to his family every night. He could have cut short his mission right then. But he didn't want to leave his fellow soldiers from the Second Battalion Princess Patricia's Light Infantry. So he chose to stay longer. He was killed shortly after that.

Jim Davis is Corporal Paul Davis' father. He has spent a lot of time thinking about how he'd feel as the number of Canadians killed in Afghanistan reached 100. To commemorate those lives, he spoke with the CBC's Mary Lynk and remembered his own son.

Jim Davis is the father of Corporal Paul Davis, the 9th Canadian soldier to die in Afghanistan. We began this morning with the roll call of the first 50 Canadians who lost their lives serving in Afghanistan. We continued with the rest of those names.

And now another 3 ... Corporal Mark Robert McLaren, age 23. Private Demetrios Diplaros, age 25. Warrant Officer Robert John Wilson, age 27. They were killed Friday while on partrol west of Kandahar City when their armoured vehicle hit a roadside bomb. Their coffins will arrive at CFB Trenton today.


Music Bridge

Artist: Symphony Nova Scotia, Maurice Lennon (Composer)
CD: "Scott MacMillan's: MacKinnon's Brook Suite"
Cut: Track 8, "If Ever You Were Mine"
Label: WEA
Spine: 2 40945

 

Listen to Part One:

 

Zimbabwe - Care Canada

If you turn on a tap in Zimbabwe's capital city, there's a good chance you won't get any water. And if you do, there's good chance it will make you very, very sick. Harare's water system has all but collapsed. And its water supply is now contaminated with cholera. Across the country, at least 565 people have died from cholera since August. More than 12,000 are now infected. And that number is growing.

Under ordinary circumstances, cholera is easily treated. But in most countries where there's a cholera outbreak ... nothing is ordinary and Zimbabwe is no exception. The country's hospitals are spilling over with patients and raw sewage is spilling over into the streets, making cities like Harare a perfect breeding ground for the deadly disease.

Last week, President Robert Mugabe declared a state of emergency and the country's Health Minister pleaded for international help. But President Mugabe also took the time to blame international sanctions for causing the situation in the first place.

Aid workers in Zimbabwe were already struggling to cope with a humanitarian crisis. And the cholera outbreaks are making their jobs even more difficult. Teresa Chiesa is a Program Manager with CARE Canada and she was in Harare.

Zimbabwe - Shakeman Mugari

The expanding humanitarian crisis in Zimbabwe is being made worse by the failure of the power-sharing government. Robert Mugabe's Zanu-PF and Morgan Tsvangirai's Movement for Democratic Change are supposed to be ruling together. But they've made little progress so far.

Last week, retired South African Archbishop Desmond Tutu laid the blame on Robert Mugabe, and said it was time for him to go. We aired a clip.

Well South African government officials are in Zimbabwe today assessing the scale of the humanitarian crisis as international calls grow for Robert Mugabe to step down. EU Foreign Policy Chief, Javier Solana said today that Mr. Mugabe must be pressured to go. The United States and Britain said last week that Mr. Mugabe's departure was overdue.

Shakeman Mugari is a journalist with the Zimbabwe Independent newspaper and he also writes freelance for the Globe and Mail. He has risked his life by writing and reporting facts that are critical of the Mugabe government and it's human rights violations. Shakeman Mugari was in our Toronto studio. He is in Canada to receive an International Press Freedom Award tonight from the Canadian Journalists for Free Expression.

 

Listen to Part Two:

 

Stolen Art

On September 4, 1972, a group of thieves staged a brazen heist at Montreal's Museum of Fine Art. They broke into the museum through a skylight and proceeded to take seventeen paintings, including Rembrandt's "Landscape with Cottages." That was 36 years ago. And those paintings haven't been seen since.

According to Jonathan Webb, this kind of thing happens more often than you would think. And whether it's looting archaeological sites or literally stealing paintings off of museum walls, he says it's a travesty that does a disservice to us all. Jonathan Webb's new book is called Stolen Art: The Gallery of Missing Masterpieces and he was in Paris, France.


Last Word

Later today on CBC Radio One, it's The Point and host Aamer Haleem is wading into the war of the microbreweries and asking how much labels matter when it comes to what we drink. That's The Point at 2 o'clock -- 2:30 in Newfoundland and Labrador. And tonight at 10 o'clock on CBC Television, The National will look back to the TV showdown that's inspired Frost/Nixon, one of the year's most anticipated movies.

We began the program today with the names of the Canadians who have died serving in Afghanistan ... one hundred of them now. And we wanted to end the program today with a song that was originally written by a Scottish folk singer. It's based on the account of an Australian soldier who fought in World War One, and came home wounded, conflicted, and frustrated by the apathy of his fellow countrymen. The last word went to the Pogues' rendition of "The Band Played Waltzing Matilda."

Music

Artist: Pogues
CD: "Pogues: The Very Best of Pogues
Cut: 21, "And the Band Played Waltzing Matilda"
Label: WSM 2 87459

 

Listen to Part Three:

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