December 5, 2008

Pt 1: Quebec Shakedown - "Not from Quebec separatists." In case you couldn't make it out over the ruckus, that's what Stephen Harper said during question period earlier this week. That a Prime Minister's mandate should come from the Canadian people, not from Quebec separatists.

Read more here

Pt 2: Tasers Talk Tape - As you may have heard on the news, the CBC and Radio Canada commissioned a series of tests on Taser stun guns. The tests measured the electrical output of the weapons. And some of them delivered more current than Taser International -- the company that manufactures the stun guns -- says is possible. In some of the test-firings, the guns delivered 50 per cent more current.

Read more here

Pt 3: Reality TV - Phsychiatrist -Shows like those are generally thought of as the junk food of the television universe. But like it or not, reality TV still reigns all these years later. The Amazing Race, Styalista, Hell's Kitchen ... they all reel in the viewers week after week.

Read more here

Today's guest host was Jim Brown.

It's Friday, December 5th.

Stephen Harper says he hopes to work productively with the opposition parties as he prepares his budget.

Currently, Now if only there was someplace they could meet ... you know, just to talk? Some kind of... common... house?

This is The Current.


Quebec Shakedown

"Not from Quebec separatists." In case you couldn't make it out over the ruckus, that's what Stephen Harper said during question period earlier this week. That a Prime Minister's mandate should come from the Canadian people, not from Quebec separatists.

Now there's concern that this week's anti-separatist rhetoric may have lasting consequences. We aired a clip of Liberal leadership contender Michael Ignatieff's take on it.

Quebeckers head to the ballot box on Monday for their provincial election after a week in which the word 'traitor' was thrown around the House of Commons at least a few times. It was bound to raise some ire among voters. We aired some thoughts about the current political crisis from the streets of Montreal.

For her thoughts on how the goings-on at Parliament Hill have influenced the political dynamic in Quebec, we were joined by Dominique Ollivier. She's a former vice president of the Parti Quebecois and former advisor the the Bloc's Gilles Duceppe. This morning she was in our Ottawa studio.


DNTO Satire Song

Well it's worth taking a moment to reflect on how we got into this mess in the first place. We heard from CBC Radio's Comedy Factory in Winnipeg with their little ditty.


Quebec Shakedown - Columnist

So, did Stephen Harper's counter-attack on the opposition coalition and its silent partner, the Bloc Quebecois, help strengthen the separatist movement in Quebec? For another perspective on that question, we're joined by William Johnson. He's a columnist for the Globe and Mail and a founder of the now defunct federalist group Alliance Quebec. He's also the author of Stephen Harper and The Future of Canada and he was in Ottawa.

 

Listen to Part One:

 

Tasers Talk Tape

As you may have heard on the news, the CBC and Radio Canada commissioned a series of tests on Taser stun guns. The tests measured the electrical output of the weapons. And some of them delivered more current than Taser International -- the company that manufactures the stun guns -- says is possible. In some of the test-firings, the guns delivered 50 per cent more current.

Sandra Bartlett is a reporter with CBC News and is part of the investigative team that commissioned the testing. She was in Toronto.


Music Bridge

Performer: Five Stone
CD: Instrumentals
Cut: "Strike and Fade"
Label: November Sixteenth Publishing


Terry Promo

Terry Martin has spent years on the streets of Halifax. From time to time, he'd have a small place of his own. But he often stayed at a men's shelter. What kept him going was the promise of the golden egg ... Old Age Security.

For Terry, the government cheque spelled Freedom 65 ... a chance to do better than welfare to live more freely. The CBC's Bob Murphy followed Terry for more than a year as Terry's goal of financial independence approached.

And next week, Bob will bring us a documentary called "Happy Birthday Terry." We aired an excerpt from it.

 

Listen to Part Two:

 

Reality TV - Phsychiatrist


We started this segment with a montage of reality TV shows.

Shows like those are generally thought of as the junk food of the television universe. But like it or not, reality TV still reigns all these years later. The Amazing Race, Styalista, Hell's Kitchen ... they all reel in the viewers week after week.

And according to Joel Gold, that might be a problem. He and his brother Ian are psychiatrists. And they say they've found a number of people who suffer from delusions that may have been shaped by reality television.

They call what they've found, 'The Truman Show Delusion'. It's named after a movie starring Jim Carrey about a man who is unaware that his entire life is being filmed for television. We aired a clip from the movie.

Or maybe not so brilliant if you're Joel Gold. Remember, he and his brother are the ones who have documented what they call 'The Truman Show Delusion'. Joel Gold is also a psychiatrist at Bellevue Hospital in New York City. He's also a Professor of Psychiatry at New York University's School of Medicine.

Reality TV - Democratic Tool

But according to Marwan Kraidy, reality TV isn't just affecting us as individuals. It's changing whole countries and cultures. He's a Professor at the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania. And he's been looking at the ways that reality TV is affecting the development of democracy in the Arab world.


Last Word - Violence Against Women

Later today on CBC Radio One, it's The Point and host Aamer Haleem is asking if after all these years, it's time for the next Dr. Who to be a woman. That's The Point at 2 o'clock -- 2:30 in Newfoundland and Labrador. And tonight at 10 o'clock on CBC Television, The National will have more on the results from the CBC-commissioned study on the safety of Taser stun guns.

Tomorrow is the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women. It was 19 years ago that Marc Lepine went on a shooting rampage at the Ecole Polytechnique in Montreal, killing 14 women and wounding many others. And we ended the program this week with a song performed by Nina Alstrom. The lyrics were written by a group of formerly incarcerated women in British Columbia, some of whom knew the victims of convicted killer, Robert Pickton. It's called "You Light the Way".

 

Listen to Part Three:

Comments are closed.