October 29, 2008

Pt 1: Monia Mazigh Interview - We know her best as the wife of Maher Arar, a woman who worked tirelessly to free her husband from a Syrian prison where he was held on suspicion of terrorist activity and tortured. Monia Mazigh became the face - and the voice - of a campaign that attracted international attention. Her efforts led to Maher Arar being released and, ultimately, vindicated.

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Pt 2: White Supremacists - Late last week, two men were arrested in Arkansas for allegedly plotting to kill a hundred black students at a school and then assassinate U. S. Democratic Presidential candidate, Barack Obama. The two men are said to be white supremacists from Tennessee.

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Pt 3: The Great Depression - People who work in the financial world don't likely need to be reminded that today is the 79th anniversary of Black Tuesday -- the day the Dow Jones dropped precipitously and set off widespread panic. Sound familiar?

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Whole Show Blow-by-Blow

It's Wednesday, October 29th.

The Canadian auto parts industry is asking the federal and Ontario governments for a billion dollars in immediate loans to get it through a collapsing car market.

Currently, the Canadian auto induassured both levels of government that it isn't merely stuck in an old business model ... and that the shift toward velocipedes and fuel-efficient jalopies is just a passing trend.

This is The Current

Monia Mazigh Interview

We know her best as the wife of Maher Arar, a woman who worked tirelessly to free her husband from a Syrian prison where he was held on suspicion of terrorist activity and tortured. Monia Mazigh became the face - and the voice - of a campaign that attracted international attention. Her efforts led to Maher Arar being released and, ultimately, vindicated.

Ms. Mazigh's fight was very public. But privately, she struggled to balance her commitments as a mother - effectively a single mother - with fighting for her husband. Maher Arar emerged from the saga a changed man. And Monia Mazigh's ordeal left profound marks on her, too.

She has written a book about her experiences, called Hope and Despair: My Struggle to Free My Husband Maher Arar. Anna Maria sat down with both Monia Mazigh and Maher Arar at their home in Ottawa last week. 

*** Special Feature:  We have added an extended version of Anna Maria Tremonti's interview with Monia Mazigh, the wife of Maher Arar:




PART TWO

White Supremacists

Late last week, two men were arrested in Arkansas for allegedly plotting to kill a hundred black students at a school and then assassinate U. S. Democratic Presidential candidate, Barack Obama. The two men are said to be white supremacists from Tennessee.

Authorities picked them up after they shot out the window of a church and used sidewalk chalk to write the numbers 14 and 88 on the side of the car they were driving.

Those numbers don't mean much to most people. But they signify plenty to James Ridgeway. He's the Senior Washington correspondent for Mother Jones magazine. He's written extensively about the neo-Nazi movement in the United States, including a book called Blood in the Face. This week, James Ridgeway was traveling across the U.S., and writing about the election for the British newspaper, The Guardian. He was in Cleveland, Ohio for the show.


PART THREE

The Great Depression

People who work in the financial world don't likely need to be reminded that today is the 79th anniversary of Black Tuesday -- the day the Dow Jones dropped precipitously and set off widespread panic. Sound familiar?

Well, the 1929 collapse only lasted a month, but the consequences were long-lasting. As the Roaring Twenties whimpered into 1930, unemployment had already started to climb. The Great Depression that followed the market crash left millions.

And just about everyone's who's not old enough to remember the Great Depression is nervously pondering whether we're entering a new one. For more perspective on how the current economic crisis stacks up to the Great Depression. For the show, Anna Maria was joined by Amity Shlaes. She's a senior fellow in economic history at the Council on Foreign Relations and the author of The Forgotten Man: A New History of The Great Depression.

A Global Perspective

A major contrast between the 1929 stock market crash and today's market volatility lies in the markets themselves. International economies are interwoven in a way that has a big impact on the consequences - near and far - of a market downturn. The upside is that no country is left to do it alone, economically. But it also means that no part of the world is immune from whatever ails the global economy.

For more on that global perspective, Anna Maria was joined by Harry Broadman a former World Bank economist and presidential advisor who is now Managing Director of the global strategy firm The Albright Group and Chief Economist of Albright Capital Management LLC. Harry Broadman was in our Washington, D.C. studio for the show.

Last Word

Earlier in the show we heard from Maher Arar and his wife, Monia Mazigh. And of course, Mr. Arar was not the only Canadian to be detained and tortured abroad. Abdullah Almalki, Ahmad Abou-Elmaati and Muayyed Nureddin all suffered similar fates.

Last week, former Supreme Court Justice Frank Iacobucci delivered his report into their cases and it found that Canadian officials indirectly contributed to the unlawful arrest, arbitrary detention and torture of the three men. We finished this show with Maher Arar's thoughts about the Iacobucci Inquiry.

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