September 15, 2008

Pt 1: Who's Afraid of Elizabeth May? - The Green Party has yet to elect a single Member of Parliament. It's polling around 10 per cent nationally. And until last week, it was deemed unworthy of being included in the televised leaders' debates.

Download Flash Player to view this content.


Pt 2: The Well - Documentary - In most parts of Canada, a simple twist of the tap will get you a glass of fresh, clean drinking water. But it's not so easy elsewhere. Across Africa, more than a third of the population doesn't have access to clean drinking water. In Ethiopia, it's three-quarters of the population.

Download Flash Player to view this content.


Pt 3: Haiti - Gonaives is the city hit hardest by Hurricane Ike. Ike was the fourth storm to come crashing into Haiti in less than a month. And while the whole region has suffered, Haiti has been devastated. The death toll there has been much higher even compared to the Dominican Republic, the country that sits on the other half of the island of Hispaniola.

Download Flash Player to view this content.



It's Monday, September 15th.

Elizabeth May spent the weekend outlining the Green Party's plan to cut personal and business taxes in order to increase taxes on carbon-producing fuels.

Currently, Stephane Dion was still trying to explain this thing I think it has to do with the environment he calls it the "Green Shift" or something you know, that thing that's gonna destroy the economy and make Alberta and Quebec separate. Yeah, that's the one.

This is The Current.


Who's Afraid of Elizabeth May?


The Green Party has yet to elect a single Member of Parliament. It's polling around 10 per cent nationally. And until last week, it was deemed unworthy of being included in the televised leaders' debates.

But as we begin week two of the federal election campaign, Elizabeth May has a lot of people on the run. She stared down Stephen Harper and Jack Layton, as well as the consortium of broadcasters that stages the leaders' debate and fought her way to a place at the podium. In the process, she generated a groundswell of sympathy from across the political spectrum and has many partisans of opposing stripes wondering if her rising fortunes might just come at their expense. It's a prospect that makes David Suzuki very happy.

Now not everyone's reaction to Elizabeth May is quite so, um ... visceral. But still, David Suzuki raises a question worth asking -- Who's afraid of Elizabeth May?
My next two guests have spent the weekend compiling their lists.

Judy Rebick holds the CAW-Sam Gindin Chair in Social Justice and Democracy at Ryerson University in Toronto. And Steven Brown is the Director of the Laurier Institute for the Study of Public Opinion and Policy in Waterloo, Ontario.




The Well - Documentary

In most parts of Canada, a simple twist of the tap will get you a glass of fresh, clean drinking water. But it's not so easy elsewhere. Across Africa, more than a third of the population doesn't have access to clean drinking water. In Ethiopia, it's three-quarters of the population. For many Ethiopians, getting any water at all means a long walk to a community well. So The Current's Documentary Editor, Dick Miller, decided to pay a visit to one of them. He brought back a documentary called The Well, which is part of our on-going look at water issues called Watershed. Dick Miller joined Anna Maria in Toronto.




Part 3:
Haiti

Gonaives is the city hit hardest by Hurricane Ike. Ike was the fourth storm to come crashing into Haiti in less than a month. And while the whole region has suffered, Haiti has been devastated. The death toll there has been much higher even compared to the Dominican Republic, the country that sits on the other half of the island of Hispaniola.

Reed Lindsay has been covering the destruction in Haiti for Global Radio News. He joined us from Port au Prince.

A History of Hurricanes

Haiti has a long history of being beset by devastating storms. But according to Paul Farmer, calling them "natural" disasters only reflects part of the story. He spent more than 25 years living and working in Haiti. He's the co-founder of Partners in Health, an organization that works with poor communities around the world. He's also the author of several books, including The Uses of Haiti and he joined us from Miami.

Raising Awareness

Four years ago this month, more than two thousand people were killed -- most of them in Gonaives -- when Hurricane Jeanne hit Haiti. In the aftermath, Wyclef Jean, an ex-pat Hatian and hip-hop musician, visited the country, as he did again yesterday with actor Matt Damon and former New Brunswick premier Frank McKenna, in the aftermath of Hurricane Ike. To raise awareness of Hurricane Jeanne's destruction back then, he wrote this song, It's called "Gonaives".

Comments are closed.