August 13, 2008

Pt 1: Olympic Digital Games - And a handful of especially dedicated gamers have an ambitious plan for where they'll go next. They want to make video gaming an official Olympic Event. And they're making progress.

Read more here

Pt 2: Anthrax Bio Labs - Shortly after the attacks of 9/11, the United States was gripped by another threat. Packages containing lethal strains of anthrax were mailed to congressional representatives and media outlets, along with unsigned notes calling for "death to America.

Read more here



Satire

It's Wednesday, August 13th.

Jonathan Black, the son of former press baron Conrad Black, has pleaded guilty to leaving the scene of an accident that happened last March.

Currently, Lord Black says he's imponderably disappointed in his son ... and finds it beyond credulity that he would proffer such an unconscionable admission of culpability.

This is The Current.


Olympic Digital Games

And a handful of especially dedicated gamers have an ambitious plan for where they'll go next. They want to make video gaming an official Olympic Event. And they're making progress. This fall, a competitive gaming company called Global Gaming will host The Digital Games in Shanghai, China. The international competition has been granted "Official Olympic Welcome Event" status, which means the organizers may brand the event with the Beijing Olympic logo. Now that's still a long way from official Olympic competition.

And there's lots of skepticism about the idea of video games as sport and gamers as athletes. But not from Johnathan Wendel. He's a competitive gamer with 12 world titles to his name. He plays under the gamer tag, "Fatal1ty" and he joined us from Las Vegas.

Bruce Kidd also joined us in coversation. He is a former Olympic track and field athlete who's now the Dean of the Faculty of Physical Education and Health at the University of Toronto.



Listen to Part One: 

 

Anthrax Bio Labs

Shortly after the attacks of 9/11, the United States was gripped by another threat. Packages containing lethal strains of anthrax were mailed to congressional representatives and media outlets, along with unsigned notes calling for "death to America." The anthrax packages killed five people and made dozens more sick. At the time, many people assumed the attacks were carried out by radical Islamists from outside the United States. But now, seven years later, the U.S. Department of Justice believes that a U.S. Army scientist named Bruce Ivins was the sole person responsible. Dr. Ivins is believed to have committed suicide late last month, shortly after the FBI informed him that he would likely be charged in connection with the attacks.

The evidence presented by the Department of Justice has answered a lot of questions about the attacks. But not nearly enough for Richard Ebright. He's a biochemist at Rutgers University and he says that the U.S. Government's response to the 2001 anthrax attacks might actually have made another attack more likely.

Richard Ebright isn't alone in his concerns. Laurie Garrett is a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist and a Senior Fellow of Global Health at the Council on Foreign Relations. She has been covering the dangers of bioterrorism for years and she joined us from New York City.




Listen to Part Two:

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